NameFirst Scilly DEASON , Son, M

FatherOriginal DEASON , M

Spouses

Unmarried

ChildrenHenry , M (~1700->1741)

 Francis , M (~1700->1751)

 Thomas , M (~1700-<1743)

 John , M (~1700-1774)

 Another Son , M



NameThomas DEASON , Grandson, M

Birthabout 1700, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Deathbefore 1743

FatherFirst Scilly DEASON , M

Spouses

1Mary LAKEY , F

Birthabout 1700, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Marriage22 May 1735, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

ChildrenElizabeth , F (~1735-)

 Mary , F (~1737-)

 Joseph , M (~1739-)

 John , M (~1739-1812)

Notes for Thomas DEASON

At the time of their marriage in 1735, both Thomas and Mary were recorded as being from Tresco.2
At the time of the baptism of their daughters, Elizabeth, 1735 and Mary, 1737 and Grace 1753, the family was noted as living at Tresco.2

Mary married John Chapman, 3 January 1743, Isles of Scilly. Mary was noted as a “widow” and both from St Mary’s. This indicates that Thomas Deason must have previously died.2

Acknowledgements:
• Phill Deason, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, England
• Rick Smith, Launceston Tasmania, Australia
• Duff family researchers (ex Rick Smith, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia)
• R M Baxter research (ex Reg Deason, Christchurch, New Zealand

General references:
• International Genealogical Index (1998-2006), Parish Baptismal, Marriage and Burial records, extract Greg Campbell, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007, for Deason, Cornwall, England (ref – D_Doc_#101, #102 & #103)
• www.Ancestry.com, 2006, England and Wales, Birth, Marriage &Death Indexes, 1837-1983, Extract Greg Campbell, Jan 2006, for Deason, Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#101, #102 & #103)
• www.conwalleng.com, 2005, Cornwall Parish Register index - Births & Marriages, extract Greg Campbell, Oct 2005, for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#101 & #102)
• Federation of Family History Societies & Associates, 2004, National Burial Index, Edition 2, (1813-1837), extract Greg Campbell, Dec 2004 for Deason, Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#103)
• General Records Office, 2000 & later, Birth, Marriage & Death indexes, 1838-1983, checked by Greg Campbell on an individual basis
• Leslie Deason & Phill Deason, c1960 – 2004, Deason Family Tree, transcribed Greg Campbell, 2004 (ref- D_Doc_#127)
• Rick Smith, 2005, Deason Family Tree (ref – D_Doc_#136)
• Duff family research, 2005, Deason Family Tree, extract July 2005, Rick Smith for Deason, Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#139 & #140)
• R M Baxter, 1975, Deason Family Tree (ref – D_Doc_#149, #150 & #151)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Baptisms pre & post 1813, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall (ref-D_Doc_#212)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Cornwall Baptisms, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall, 1755 to 1900 (ref-D_Doc_#224)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Cornwall Marriages, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall, 1700-1904 (ref-D_Doc_#222) Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Cornwall Burials, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall, 1700-1904 (ref-D_Doc_#226)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Burials post 1815, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall (ref-D_Doc_#213)
• Dianne Donohue, 2005, Burials for Isles of Scillies 1818-1886 & Non-conformist burials for Isles of Scillies (1886-1906) (ref-D_Doc_#214)
• General Records Office, 2005, 1841 Census of England & Wales, extract Greg Campbell, May 2005 for Deason, Cornwall (ref - D_Doc_#100)
• Phill Deason, 2004, Correspondence

Notes for Mary (Spouse 1)

Mary was from Tresco.



NameJohn DEASON , G Grandson, M

Birthabout 1739, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Baptism26 December 1741, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

DeathJune 1812, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Burial30 June 1812, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

FatherThomas DEASON , M (~1700-<1743)

MotherMary LAKEY , F (~1700-)

Spouses

1Elizabeth NICHOLS OR NICHOLLS , F

Birthabout 1746

Burial20 November 1825, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

DeathNovember 1825, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Marriage5 November 1764, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

ChildrenElizabeth , F (~1765-)

 Mary , F (1767-)

 Mary , F (~1767-~1767)

 Thomas , M (~1771-<1785)

 John , M (~1777-~1854)

 Margaret , F (~1780-)

 Ann , F (1782-~1841)

 Thomas , M (~1785-1830)

 Caroline , F (~1790-~1870)

Notes for John DEASON

John was from Tresco.

Source Information:
Batch No.:  Dates:  Source Call No.:  Type:  Printout Call No.:  Type: 
C022062  1726 - 1799  0254230   Film  0883642   Film 
Sheet: 00
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note: Rick Smith’s family tree (Aug, 2005) notes John as born 1739. Phill Deason’s tree (Sep, 2004) notes 1740.2

At the time of their marriage in 1764 John and Elizabeth were noted as being from Tresco. Note: Duff family research records their marriage as being at St Mary’s. Note: Baxter research (1975) notes spelling as “Nicholls” and Duff research (2006) “Nichols”.2

At the time of the baptism of Mary (1767), Mary (1768), Thomas (1771), John (1777), Margaret (1780), Ann (1782), Thomas (1785) and Caroline (1790), the family is noted as being from Tresco.2

John was recorded as a tenant of Trescow in the Rent Roll ended Michs [Michaelmas] 1780 – yearly rent £3 - 2 – 3.2

At the time of his burial in 1812, John was noted as aged 73 years.2

At the time of her burial in 1825, Elizabeth was noted as aged 73 years and from Tresco.2

Notes for Elizabeth (Spouse 1)

Elizabeth was from Tresco.

http://www.ellis.genproxy.co.uk/d0000/g0000040.html#I933:
Possibly bapt 8 May 1743, the daughter of Ismeal Nichols and
Mary Clark who married 23 Dec 1734 (of St Agnes) **OR** maybe
bapt 5 jul 1747, the daughter of Peter Nichols and Elizabeth
Pendar who married 13 Apr 1740 (no islands stated).



NameJohn DEASON , GG Grandson, M

Birthabout 1777, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Baptism1 June 1777, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Deathabout 29 July 1854, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Burial29 July 1854, Probably St Nicholas's Churchyard, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

OccupationFarmer

FatherJohn DEASON , M (~1739-1812)

MotherElizabeth NICHOLS OR NICHOLLS , F (~1746-1825)

Spouses

1Ann ELLIS , F

Birth3 December 1779, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Burial11 December 1868, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Deathabout 11 December 1868

FatherMartin ELLIS , M (~1742-)

MotherRebecca NICHOLLS , F

Marriage4 November 1803, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

ChildrenGrace Blampey (Blamey?) (Illegitimate), F (~1803-)

 John , M (~1805-1859)

 Ann , F (~1807-)

 Thomas , M (~1809-~1891)

 Rebecca , F (~1811-1883)

 Elizabeth , F (~1813-~1894)

 Mary , F (~1815-1881)

 Caroline , F (~1818-1888)

Notes for John DEASON

John DEASON
Sex:  M
Event(s):
Christening:  1 Jun 1777
Scilly Islands Parish, Cornwall, England
Parents:
Father:  John DEASON
Mother:  Elizabeth
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source Information:
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
C022062 1726-1799 0254230 Film 0883642 Film

John was from Tresco.

William was born well before marriage.

At the time of John’s baptism in 1777 the family was noted as living at Tresco.

At the time of John and Ann’s marriage in 1803 John was noted as a “bachelor” and Ann a “spinster”, both of Tresco. They were married by banns by David Evans; John Deason made his mark “X” - Ann did not; witnesses A Mackey and Peter Nickalls [sic].

At the time of the baptism of son, John, in 1805 the family was either living on St Agnes (Duff research (2005) or Tresco (Baxter research (1975). At the time of the baptisms of Ann (1807), Thomas (1809), Rebecca (1811), Elizabeth (1813), Mary (1815) and Caroline (1818) the family was living on Tresco.

John is likely to be the ‘John Deason’ part owner, with Abraham Nicholls, John Nicholls, Samuel Nicholls and Peter Nicholls (see note) and others of the Ranger II, registered 1813, Tresco, 19 tons, 1868, ‘ceased to exist’ 1868. Note: All of the above Nicholls, except Samuel, are recorded in the 1841 Census as living on Tresco.

At the time of the marriage of Caroline (1837) John was noted as a “farmer”.

At the time of John’s burial in 1859 he was noted as aged 77 years and from Tresco.

At the time of Ann’s burial in 1868 she was noted as aged 89 years and from Tresco.

The 1841 Census recorded:
Tresco Green, Tresco, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall:
John Deason, age: 60 years, occupation: farmer, born: Cornwall
Ann Deason, age: 60 years, born: Cornwall
Elizabeth Deason, age: 25 years, born: Cornwall
Richard Deason , age: 11 years, born: Cornwall
Mary Deason, age: 6 years, born: Cornwall

Note: Richard is probably John and Ann Deason’s grandson. However, Mary Deason’s relationship is unclear. (further research required).

The 1851 Census recorded:
Tresco, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall:
John Deason, head (of household), married, age: 73 years, occupation: farmer 3 acres, born: Tresco, Isles of Scilly
Ann Deason, wife, married, age: 72 years, occupation: farmer’s wife, born: Tresco, Isles of Scilly
Elizabeth Deason, daughter, unmarried, age: 36 years, occupation: farmer’s daughter, born: Tresco, Isles of Scilly

John is likely to be the ‘John Deason’ part owner, with Abraham Nicholls, John Nicholls, Samuel Nicholls and Peter Nicholls (see note) and others of the Ranger II, registered 1813, Tresco, 19 tons, 1868, ‘ceased to exist’ 1868. Note: All of the above Nicholls, except Samuel, are recorded in the 1841 Census as living on Tresco.

At the time of John’s burial in 18594 he was noted as aged 77 years and from Tresco.

The 1861 Census recorded:
Green, Tresco, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall:
Ann Deason, head (of household), widower, age: 82 years, occupation: formerly farmer’s wife, born: Tresco, Isles of Scilly
Elizabeth Deason, daughter, unmarried, age: 47 years, occupation: spinner, born: Tresco, Isles of Scilly

Transcribed from the “Off Island Registers” by the late R. M. Baxter:
MARRIAGE: 4 November 1803
John Deason, bachelor, & Ann Ellis, spinster, both of Tresco Island,
Scilly, were married in this church of Tresco aforesaid by Banss by me David
Evans M:A +c
This marriage was solemnised between us (the mark X of John Deason
( Ann Ellis
In the presence of (A. Mackey
(Peter Nickalls

At the time of their marriage John was noted as a “bachelor” and Ann a “spinster”, both of Tresco. They were married by banns by David Evans; John Deason made his mark “X” - Ann did not; witnesses A Mackey and Peter Nickalls [sic].2

At the time of the baptism of son, John, in 1805 the family was either living on St Agnes (Duff family research) or Tresco (Baxter (1975) research. At the time of the baptism of Ann (1807), Thomas (1809), Elizabeth (1813), Mary (1815) and Caroline (1818) the family was living on Tresco. At the time of the marriage of Caroline (1837) John was noted as a “farmer”. At the time of John's burial in 1859 he was noted as aged 77 years and from Tresco. At the time of Ann's burial in 1868 she was noted as aged 89 years and from Tresco.2

At the time of Ann’s burial in 1868 she was noted as aged 89 years and from Tresco.

Acknowledgements:
• Phill Deason, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, England
• Rick Smith, Launceston Tasmania, Australia
• Duff family researchers (ex Rick Smith, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia)
• R M Baxter research (ex Reg Deason, Christchurch, New Zealand)
• Margaret Owens, Australia (ex Rick Smith, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia)

General references:
• International Genealogical Index (1998-2006), Parish Baptismal, Marriage and Burial records, extract Greg Campbell, 2004, 2005, 2006 & 2007, for Deason, Cornwall, England (ref – D_Doc_#101, #102 & #103)
• www.Ancestry.com, 2006, England and Wales, Birth, Marriage &Death Indexes, 1837-1983, extract Greg Campbell, Jan 2006, for Deason, Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#101, #102 & #103)
• www.conwalleng.com, 2005, Cornwall Parish Register index - Births & Marriages, extract Greg Campbell, Oct 2005, for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#101 & #102)
• Federation of Family History Societies & Associates, 2004, National Burial Index, Edition 2, (1813-1837), extract Greg Campbell, Dec 2004 for Deason, Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#103)
• General Records Office, 2000 & later, Birth, Marriage & Death indexes, 1838-1983, checked by Greg Campbell on an individual basis
• Leslie Deason & Phill Deason, c1960 – 2004, Deason Family Tree, transcribed Greg Campbell, 2004 (ref- D_Doc_#127)
• Rick Smith, 2005, Deason Family Tree (ref – D_Doc_#136)
• Duff family research, 2005, Deason Family Tree, extract July 2005, Rick Smith for Deason, Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#139 & #140)
• R M Baxter, 1975, Deason Family Tree (ref – D_Doc_#149, #150 & #151)
• www.ellis.genproxy.co.uk, 2005, Ellis Family Tree, as incorporated into Deason Family Tree, 2005, Rick Smith (ref – D_Doc_#136)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Baptisms pre & post 1813, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall (ref-D_Doc_#212)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Cornwall Baptisms, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall, 1755 to 1900 (ref-D_Doc_#224)
• Dianne Donohue, 2005, Baptisms for Isles of Scillies 1837-1903 (ref-D_Doc_#231)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Cornwall Marriages, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall, 1700-1904 (ref-D_Doc_#222)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Cornwall Marriage Banns, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall, 1837-1904 (ref-D_Doc_#221)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Marriages post 1815, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall (ref-D_Doc_#216)
• Dianne Donohue, 2005, Marriages for Isles of Scillies 1837-1900 (ref-D_Doc_#217)
• Dianne Donohue, 2005, Marriage Banns for Isles of Scillies 1835-1925 (ref-D_Doc_#215) Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Cornwall Burials, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall, 1700-1904 (ref-D_Doc_#226)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Burials post 1815, extract June 2008, Greg Campbell for Deason, Cornwall (ref-D_Doc_#213)
• Dianne Donohue, 2005, Burials for Isles of Scillies 1818-1886 & Non-conformist burials for Isles of Scillies (1886-1906) (ref-D_Doc_#214)
• General Records Office, 2005, 1841 Census of England & Wales, extract Greg Campbell, May 2005 for Deason, Cornwall (ref - D_Doc_#100)
• General Records Office, 2005, 1851 Census of England & Wales, extract Greg Campbell, May 2005 for Deason, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall (ref - D_Doc_#098)
• General Records Office, 2005, 1881 Census of England & Wales, extract Greg Campbell, May 2005 for Deason, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall (ref - D_Doc_#099)
• Margaret Owens, 2007, Deason Family Tree, extracts for Deasons in Cornwall from Parish Registers and Censuses 1841 to 1901, (ex Rick Smith, Launceston, Tasmania) (ref D_Doc_#194)
• Phill Deason, 2004, Correspondence

Notes for Ann (Spouse 1)

Ann was from Tresco.

Isles of Scilly 1861, RG1600

Tresco, Scilly Isles

Ed4 Folio 65 Page 6 shd 22

Green

DEASON Annie (?) head 82, wid, formerly farmers wife, Tresco
Elizabeth Dau 47, un, spinner Tresco



NameJohn DEASON , GGG Grandson, M

Birthabout 1805, Probably Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Baptism20 March 1805, Probably Tresco Parish Anglican, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Death25 April 1859, Old Grimsby, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Burial26 April 1859, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

FatherJohn DEASON , M (~1777-~1854)

MotherAnn ELLIS , F (1779-~1868)

Spouses

1Elizabeth PENDER , F

Birthabout 1797, Tresco, Isles Of Scilly, Cornwall, England

Death12 February 1858, Falmouth, Cornwall, England

FatherPENDER , M

MotherUNNAMED , F

Marriage2 August 1830, Madron, Cornwall, England

ChildrenElizabeth , F (~1833-1842)

 John (John Henry) , M (1835-1904)

 Sarah Anne , F (1839-~1890)

Notes for John DEASON

John DEESON
Sex:  M
Event(s):
Christening:  20 Mar 1805
Scilly Islands Parish, Cornwall, England
Parents:
Father:  John DEESON
Mother:  Ann
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source Information:
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
P022061 1799-1875 0254230-0254232 Film 0821158 Film
P022061 1799-1875 0254230-0254232 Film

John DEASON
Sex:  M
Marriage(s):
Spouse:  Elizabeth LAKEY
Marriage:  2 Aug 1830
Madron, Cornwall, England
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Source Information:
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Batch number: Dates Source Call No. Type Printout Call No. Type
M001691 1577-1678 0236552 Film 0541764 Film
M001691 1581-1695 0090257 Film
M001691 1700-1754 0254189 Film
M001691 1754-1812 0254192 Film
M001691 1813-1837 0962269 IT 1 Film
M001691 1837-1863 0254193 Film
M001691 1863-1876 0254194 Film


At the time of John and Elizabeth’s marriage in 1830, John was noted as a: bachelor and Elizabeth a widow: both from Penzance; witnesses: Thos. Lakey and ….? Lewis; John signed and Elizabeth made her mark.

At the time of son, John’s, baptism in 1835, his father, John (snr), was noted as a “Seaman, Coastguard Service”. At the time of daughter, Sarah Anne’s baptism in 1839, father John was noted as a “Mariner”.

The 1841 Census recorded:
13 Regent Place, Penzance, Cornwall:
John Deason, age: 35 years, occupation: mariner, born Cornwall
Elizabeth Deason, age: 20 years, born Cornwall
Elizabeth Deason, age: 8 years, born Cornwall
John Deason, age: 5 years, born Cornwall
Sarah Deason, age: 2 years, born Cornwall
Note: Elizabeth’s age (20) is clearly incorrect.

At the time of the death of daughter Elizabeth in November 1842, the family was probably living in Penzance. (Elizabeth’s burial record notes her ‘abode’ as Penzance).

John Deason served in the Royal Navy and on retiring became head of the Coastguards based in Cornwall.

John is said to have piloted the Queen Victoria’s yacht to safety through fog off Penzance. This may have been in 1847 when Queen Victoria and Prince Albert made their only visit to the Isles of Scilly, staying at Tresco Abbey.

The 1851 Census recorded:
22 Chapel St, East Stonehouse, [Plymouth], Devon:
Elizabeth Deacon [sic], head (of household), married, age: 54 years, occupation: mariner’s wife, born: Tresco, Scilly Islands
John Deacon [sic], son, unmarried, age: 15 years, occupation: mariner, born: Cornwall, St Michael’s Mount
Sarah Ann Deacon [sic], daughter, age: 12 years, occupation: scholar, born: Cornwall, St Michael’s Mount
Notes:
♣ although this family was recorded in the Census as ‘Deacon’ the information clearly refers to the family of John and Elizabeth Deason; and
♣ it is likely that John Deason, ‘mariner’, was at sea and missed being recorded: Elizabeth was noted as married and a mariner’s wife.

At the time of daughter Sarah’s marriage in 1857, John was noted as a “coastguard” .

Acknowledgements:
• Phill Deason, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, England
• Rick Smith, Launceston Tasmania, Australia
• Chris Kreeger, UK
• Richard Barclay, UK
• Janice Jones, Winnipeg, Canada
• David Butler, UK
• Duff family researchers, UK

References:
Births & baptisms:
• Greg Campbell, 2005–2009, Listing of Deason Births & Baptisms in Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#101)
• Ancestry.com, 2006, England and Wales, Birth Index: 1837-1983, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 13 January 2006 (ref – D_Doc_#101a)
• www.familysearch.org, 2005, International Genealogical Index Parish Birth & Baptismal index, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 21 October 2005 (ref – D_Doc_#101b)
• www.conwalleng.com, 2005, Cornwall Parish Register Index – Baptisms, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 8 October 2005, for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#101c)
• Greg Campbell, 2000, Western Australian records for Deason (births, deaths, burials & marriages) (ref – D_Doc_#130)
• Greg Campbell, 2006, Extract of Deason births/baptisms from Duff Family Research (2006) (ref – D_Doc_#139)
• R M Baxter, 1975, Baptisms – Deason, Scilly Isles (ref – D_Doc_#149)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Parish Register Index – Baptisms Pre & Post 1813, extracts for Deason & Deeson, June 2008 (ref – D_Doc_#212)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, Baptisms – Cornwall – 1755-1900, extract for Deason, June 2008 (ref – D_Doc_#224)
• Dianne Donohue, 2005, Isles of Scilly – Baptisms – 1837 to 1903 (ref – D_Doc_#231)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerks, 2011, Baptisms – details of record, extract for Thomas Trevarthen Whear, 1832 (ref – D_Doc_#409)
Marriages:
• Greg Campbell, 2005–2009, Listing of Deason Marriages in Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#102)
• Ancestry.com, 2004 & 2006, England and Wales, Marriage Index: 1837-1983, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 7 May 2004 & 13 January 2006 (ref – D_Doc_#102a)
• www.familysearch.org, 2005 & 2007, International Genealogical Index Parish Marriage index, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 21 October 2005 & 29 May 2007 (ref – D_Doc_#102b)
• www.conwalleng.com, 2005, Cornwall Parish Register Index – Marriages, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 8 October 2005, for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#102c)
• Greg Campbell, 2000, Western Australian records for Deason (births, deaths, burials & marriages) (ref – D_Doc_#130)
• Greg Campbell, 2006, Extract of Deason marriages from Duff Family Research (2006) (ref – D_Doc_#140)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Parish Register Index – Pre & Post 1813 Marriages, extract for Deason, June 2008 (ref – D_Doc_#216)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, 2008, Marriage Banns – Cornwall – 1837-1904, extract for Deason, June 2008 (ref – D_Doc_#221)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, 2008, Marriages – Cornwall – 1700-1904, extract for Deason, June 2008 (ref – D_Doc_#222)
• Joan Huston, 2005, Isles of Scilly – Marriages – 1726-1975 (ref – D_Doc_#238)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerks, 2010, Marriages – details of record, extract for John Deason & Elizabeth Lakey, 1830 (ref – D_Doc_#402)
Deaths & burials:
• Greg Campbell, 2005-2010, Listing of Deason Deaths & Burials in Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#103)
• Ancestry.com, 2006, England and Wales, Death Index: 1837-1983, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 13 January 2006 (ref – D_Doc_#103a)
• www.familysearch.org, 2005, International Genealogical Index – Parish Burial index, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 21 October 2005 (ref – D_Doc_#103b)
• www.conwalleng.com, 2005, Cornwall Parish Register Index – Burials, extract for Deason, Cornwall, 8 October 2005, for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#103c)
• Federation of Family History Societies & Associates, 2004 & 2010, National Burial Index, extract for Deason, Cornwall, Editions 2 & 3 (1813-1837) (ref – D_Doc_#103d)
• Rick Smith, 2005, Monumental Inscriptions for the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, England (ref – D_Doc_#103e)
• Greg Campbell, 2000, Western Australian records for Deason (births, deaths, burials & marriages) (ref – D_Doc_#130)
• R M Baxter, 1975, Burials – Deason, Scilly Isles (ref – D_Doc_#151)
• Cornwall On-line Census Project, 2008, Cornwall Parish Register Index – Burials Post 1813, extract for Deason, June 2008 (ref – D_Doc_#213)
• Dianne Donohue, 2005, Isles of Scilly – Burials, Parish (1818-1886) & Non-conformist (1886-1906) (ref – D_Doc_#214)
• Cornwall On-line Parish Clerk, 2008, Burials – Cornwall – 1732-1900, extract for Deason, June 2008 (ref – D_Doc_#226)
• Margaret Owens, 2009, West Penwith Burials – 1700-1900, extract for Deason in Cornwall (ref – D_Doc_#314)
• Ancestry.com, 2011, State of California, California Death Index, 1940-1997, extract for John Evered Norton (ref – D_Doc_#415)
Censuses:
• Greg Campbell, 2005, 1841 Census of England & Wales, extract for Deason, all Cornwall, from www.west-penwith.org.uk (ref – D_Doc_#100)
• General Register Office (UK), 1861, Census of England & Wales, on board Jane Lakey (at sea), p 80 (ref – D_Doc_#156)
• General Register Office (UK), 1871, Census of England & Wales, Portreath, Cornwall, p 5 (ref – D_Doc_#157)
• General Register Office (UK), 1901, Census of England & Wales, Swansea, Glamorganshire, p 6 (ref – D_Doc_#158)
• General Register Office (UK), 1841, Census of England & Wales, Penzance, Cornwall, p 13 (ref – D_Doc_#162)
• General Register Office (UK), 1881, Census of England & Wales, Swansea, Wales, p 26 (ref – D_Doc_#278)
• General Register Office (UK), 1881, Census of England & Wales, Wandsworth, London p 24 (ref – D_Doc_#281)
• General Register Office (UK), 1881, Census of England & Wales, Willesden, London p 15 (ref – D_Doc_#282)
• General Register Office (UK), 1841, Census of England & Wales, Nancekuke, Illogan, Cornwall, p 11 (ref – D_Doc_#297)
• General Register Office (UK), 1851, Census of England & Wales, Nancekuke, Illogan, Cornwall, p 22 (ref – D_Doc_#298)
• General Register Office (UK), 1861, Census of England & Wales, Nancekuke, Illogan, Cornwall, p 1 (ref – D_Doc_#299)
• General Register Office (UK), 1851, Census of England & Wales, East Stonehouse, Plymouth, Devon, p 7 (ref – D_Doc_#401)
• General Register Office (UK), 1861, Census of England & Wales, Camborne, Cornwall, p 6 (ref – D_Doc_#403)
• General Register Office (UK), 1871, Census of England & Wales, Camborne, Cornwall, p 12 (ref – D_Doc_#404)
• General Register Office (UK), 1881, Census of England & Wales, Camborne, Cornwall, p 31 (ref – D_Doc_#405)
• National Archives of Canada, 1881, Census of Canada (ref – D_Doc_#410)
• National Archives of Canada, 1891, Census of Canada (ref – D_Doc_#411)
• US Department of Commerce and Labor – Bureau of the Census, 1900, Census of USA, Colorado Springs, Colorado, sheet #32B (ref – D_Doc_#412)
• US Department of Commerce and Labor – Bureau of the Census, 1920, Census of USA, Los Gatos, California, sheet #12A & 12B (ref – D_Doc_#413)
• US Department of Commerce and Labor – Bureau of the Census, 1930, Census of USA, Los Gatos, California, sheet #11B (ref – D_Doc_#414)
• US Department of Commerce and Labor – Bureau of the Census, 1910, Census of USA, Denver, Colorado, sheet #2B (ref – D_Doc_#416)
• General Register Office (UK), 1891, Census of England & Wales, Forest Gate, West Ham, London, p 24 (ref – D_Doc_#650)
Family trees & history:
• Leslie Deason & Phill Deason, c1960–2004, Deason Family Tree (transcribed Greg Campbell, 2004) (ref- D_Doc_#127)
• Chris Kreeger & Richard Barclay, 2006, Deason family tree (ref – D_Doc_#134)
• Rick Smith, 2005, Deason Family Tree (ref – D_Doc_#136)
• Margaret Owens, 2007 & 2009, Deason Family Tree (extracts for Deason, Cornwall from Parish Registers and Censuses 1841 to 1901) (ref – D_Doc_#194)
• Chris Kreeger, 2009, Descendant Chart for Elizabeth (Lily) Pender Deason (ref – D_Doc_#318)
• Chris Kreeger, 2009, Descendant Chart for Kingsley Liell (ref – D_Doc_#319)
• Rick Smith, 2011, Deason Family Tree (ref – D_Doc_#408)
• Chris Kreeger, 2012, Correspondence, including extract from Claire Guinness, 1983, All and about Dunsborough
Shipping & immigration:
• Public Records Office (Vic), 2008 & 2009, Index to Unassisted Inward Passenger to Victoria 1852-1923, extract for Deason & transcript from film (ref – D_Doc_#196)
• Greg Campbell, Aug 2008, Western Australia Shipping Arrivals, extract for Deason and related families, from: Genealogical Society of Western Australia, 1993, Albany Shipping Arrivals, Overseas (1900-1925); Interstate (1873-1924); Fremantle Shipping Arrivals; Overseas (1829-1890), Interstate (1885-1908); Interstate & Overseas (1898-1925); Esperance Shipping & Overland Arrivals (1839-1890); WA General Ships Index (1829-1890) & Public Records Office (UK), 2008, Outward Passengers UK (1890-1960) (ref – D_Doc_#237)
• Marion Button, 1993-1997, Passenger Lists ‘Argus’ 1861-1865, extract 13 August 2008 for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#244, 2008 – #2, 4 & 5)
• Public Records Office (Vic), 2008, 2009, Index to Outward Passengers to Interstate, UK, NZ and Foreign Ports 1852-1896, & transcript from film (ref – D_Doc_#247)
• Family History Indexes, 2002, & Public Records Office (UK), 2002, Seamen’s Crewlists, 1845-1880s, Cornwall, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#248)
• findmypast.com, 2008 & Public Register Office (UK), 2002, Passenger lists leaving UK 1890-1960, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#249)
• Society of Australian Genealogists, 2008, Australasian Genealogical Computer Index, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#250)
• City of London Guildhall Library, 2008, Index to Captains Registers of Lloyd's of London, 1851-1911, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#256)
• M Bauer & N Campbell, 1996-2001, Queensland Migrant Shipping (1866-1875), extract for Harmodius (ref – D_Doc_#257)
• Tasmanian Family History Society, 2006, Index to Passenger Arrivals and Departures from Early Launceston Newspapers 1829-1865, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#265)
• Brisbane Courier (newspaper), 1867 to 1894 (D_Doc_#268 – #42 to #462 & #X1 to #X12)
• Ancestry.com, 2009, New South Wales, Australia, Unassisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1826-1922, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#293) & Shipping Masters Dept (NSW), from 1880, Inward Shipping Arrivals, for: 1887 & 1889, Cloncurry; 1893, Leura; 1910, Otway (ref – D_Doc_#293)
• Ancestry.com, 2009, Incoming Passenger Lists & Records, 1878-1960, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#294)
• Ancestry.com, 2009, New South Wales, Australia, Unassisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1826-1922, extract for Dearson (ref – D_Doc_#307)
• B C Stephenson (for Lloyds), 1869, Lloyd’s Captain Register, p 175 (ref – D_Doc_#361)
Other information:
• Judith Engall, 1990 & John Nicholls, 1884, Correspondence, Captain Deason of The Gazelle (ref – D_Doc_#233)
• Society of Australian Genealogists, 2008, Australasian Genealogical Computer Index, extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#250)
• Queensland, 1895, Electoral Roll – Brisbane North District, p 20 (ref – D_Doc_#260)
• Government Gazette (Qld), 19 July 1890, p 864 (ref – D_Doc_#261)
• Brisbane Courier (newspaper), 1867 to 1894 (D_Doc_#268 – #42 to #462 & #X1 to #X12)
• West Australian (newspaper), 1896 to 1899 (D_Doc_#268 – #465 to #529)
• Ancestry.com, 2009 & 2010, Australian Electoral Rolls, 1901-1954, extract for Deason (ref D_Doc_#290) & Commonwealth Electoral Office, 1901-1954, Electoral Rolls for: 1906 (Boulder, WA); 1916 (Claremont); 1925 (Sussex, WA); & 1936, 1937, 1943 & 1949 (Balcatta, WA), extract for Deason (ref – D_Doc_#290)
• James Battye, 1912-1913, The Cyclopedia of Western Australia, pp 709 & 710 (ref - D_Doc_#651)
• Western Australia, 1899, Post Office Directory (copy not held)
• Ronald King, 1985, Tresco – England’s island of flowers, p 33
• Phill Deason, 2004, Correspondence
• Janice Jones, 2006, Correspondence
• David Butler, 2007, Correspondence
• Chris Kreeger, 2010 & 2012, Correspondence

Notes for Elizabeth (Spouse 1)

Elizabeth Pender was born about 1797, Tresco, Isles of Scilly (as noted on 1851 Census). As there were a number of ‘Elizabeth Penders’ born about this time on Tresco, it is not possible from baptismal records alone to determine her parents (further research required).

Elizabeth married Edmund LAKEY (?-<1830), 15 October 1816, probably Tresco, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall. At the time of their marriage they were noted as bachelor and spinster and both from Tresco. They had at least one child: Edmund LAKEY (c1820->1861); married Jane PRIDEAUX (c1822-1860), July 1845, probably Tresco, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall. Edmund (jnr) was master of the Jane Lakey (named after his late wife) on which his half-brother, John Deason, served. Edmund (snr) died before Elizabeth’s marriage to John Deason in 1830.

At the time of John and Elizabeth’s marriage in 1830, John was noted as a: bachelor and Elizabeth a widow: both from Penzance; witnesses: Thos. Lakey and ….? Lewis; John signed and Elizabeth made her mark.

At the time of son, John’s, baptism in 1835, his father, John (snr), was noted as a “Seaman, Coastguard Service”. At the time of daughter, Sarah Anne’s baptism in 1839, father John was noted as a “Mariner”.

The 1841 Census recorded:
13 Regent Place, Penzance, Cornwall:
John Deason, age: 35 years, occupation: mariner, born Cornwall
Elizabeth Deason, age: 20 years, born Cornwall
Elizabeth Deason, age: 8 years, born Cornwall
John Deason, age: 5 years, born Cornwall
Sarah Deason, age: 2 years, born Cornwall
Note: Elizabeth’s age (20) is clearly incorrect.

At the time of the death of daughter Elizabeth in November 1842, the family was probably living in Penzance. (Elizabeth’s burial record notes her ‘abode’ as Penzance).

John Deason served in the Royal Navy and on retiring became head of the Coastguards based in Cornwall.

John is said to have piloted the Queen Victoria’s yacht to safety through fog off Penzance. This may have been in 1847 when Queen Victoria and Prince Albert made their only visit to the Isles of Scilly, staying at Tresco Abbey.

The 1851 Census recorded:
22 Chapel St, East Stonehouse, [Plymouth], Devon:
Elizabeth Deacon [sic], age: wife, married, age: 54 years, occupation: mariner’s wife, born: Tresco, Scilly Islands
John Deacon [sic], son, unmarried, age: 15 years, occupation: mariner, born: Cornwall, St Michael’s Mount
Sarah Ann Deason [sic], daughter, age: 12 years, occupation: scholar, born: Cornwall, St Michael’s Mount
Notes:
* although this family was recorded in the Census as ‘Deacon’ the information clearly refers to the family of John and Elizabeth Deason; and
* it is likely that John Deason, ‘mariner’, was at sea and missed being recorded: Elizabeth was noted as married and a mariner’s wife.



NameJohn (John Henry) DEASON , GGGG Grandson, M

Birth18 October 1835, St Michaels Mount, Cornwall, England

Death12 September 1904, 56 Bryn Road, Brynmill, Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales

OccupationMaster Mariner And Captained The Clipper “Harmodius”

FatherJohn DEASON , M (~1805-1859)

MotherElizabeth PENDER , F (~1797-1858)

Spouses

1Annie Maria (Naney) (Nanny) DAVEY , F

Birthabout 1831, Probably Nancekuke, Parish Of Illogan, Cornwall

Death24 November 1909, 56 Bryn Road, Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales

OccupationMariner’s Wife In 1871

FatherThomas DAVEY , M (~1799-1878)

MotherGrace DAVEY , F (~1801-1884)

Marriage28 May 1861, Redruth, Cornwall, England

ChildrenElizabeth Pender (Lily) (Lillie) , F (~1865-)

 John Henry (Jack) , M (~1867-1933)

 Grace Davey , F (1869-1897)

 Thomas Francis , M (1872-1921)

Notes for John (John Henry) DEASON

John Deason – early life
At the time of John’s baptism in 1835 his father, John, was noted as a “seaman, coastguard service”.

The 1841 Census recorded:
13 Regent Place, Penzance, Cornwall:
John Deason, age: 35 years, occupation: mariner, born Cornwall
Elizabeth Deason, age: 20 years, born Cornwall
Elizabeth Deason, age: 8 years, born Cornwall
John Deason, age: 5 years, born Cornwall
Sarah Deason, age: 2 years, born Cornwall
Note: Elizabeth’s age (20) is clearly incorrect.

On 4 May 1850 John joined the crew of the Vivid (registered Scilly) as a ‘boy’. Crewlist records noted his ticket (i.e. certificate) as #419592, age: 14, born: Cornwall, joined ship: Scilly, previous ship: Vivid, trade: foreign (i.e. to foreign ports), discharged: 11 March 1851, Hull.

The 1851 Census recorded:
22 Chapel St, East Stonehouse, [Plymouth], Devon:
Elizabeth Deacon [sic], head (of household), married, age: 54 years, occupation: mariner’s wife, born: Tresco, Scilly Islands
John Deacon [sic], son, unmarried, age: 15 years, occupation: mariner, born: Cornwall, St Michael’s Mount
Sarah Ann Deacon [sic], daughter, age: 12 years, occupation: scholar, born: Cornwall, St Michael’s Mount
Notes:
♣ although this family was recorded in the Census as ‘Deacon’ the information clearly refers to the family of John and Elizabeth Deason; and
♣ it is likely that John Deason, ‘mariner’, was at sea and missed being recorded: Elizabeth was noted as married and a mariner’s wife.

John received his Master’s Certificate of Competency in 1860, Plymouth. It noted his certificate as #17668, born 1835, Cornwall and licensed without any restrictions. Later records (1869) list John as Master of:
- Jane Lakey – 1860-1861 & 1861-1862; operating – Cape of Good Hope;
- Mary Russell Mitford – 1862-1867 – operating East Indies and Australia;
- Harmodius – 1867-1868; operating – Australia

The 1861 Census recorded John as being at sea on the ship Jane Lakey on the night of Sunday, 7 April, 1861:
John Deason, unmarried, age: 25 years, occupation: 1st Mate, born: Mount, Cornwall.

The ship was en route from Algoa Bay [Port Elizabeth], South Africa to London. On the night of the Census (7 April 1861) the ship was at Latitude 39.30 North and Longitude 33.00 West (about 200 kms west of the Azores). The ship’s master was John’s half-brother, Edmund Lakey, age: 41 years, “widower”, born Isles of Scilly (see 227); the ship was named after Edmund’s late wife. Altogether, there were 11 crew and six passengers. Of the crew, four were recorded as being born “Scilly, Cornwall”.

John married Annie Davey, 20 May 1861 at Redruth, Cornwall.

John & Annie – later life
From 1862 to 1867 John was Master of the Mary Russell Mitford, which operated between England and the East Indies and Australia. The ship arrived at Launceston, Tasmania, 17 August 1865, from London via the Cape of Good Hope. In addition, there are other records of a “Capt Deason” sailing between Melbourne and Launceston:
o 24 August 1865, departed Launceston for Melbourne on City of Launceston;
o 25 August 1865, arrived Hobson’s Bay, Melbourne, Victoria on City of Launceston, as a saloon passenger (i.e. not ship’s master);
o 30 August 1865, arrived Launceston from Melbourne, on City of Launceston;
o 23 or 24 September 1865, departed Launceston for Melbourne on City of Launceston;
o 25 September 1865, arrived Hobson’s Bay, Melbourne, Victoria City of Launceston, as a saloon passenger (i.e. not ship’s master); and
o 30 September, arrived Launceston from Melbourne on City of Launceston.
Note: There is also a record of Capt Deason arriving Victoria, 21 August 1865 on the Mary Russell Mitford. However, actual newspaper and government shipping arrivals do not indicate any arrival in Victoria at this time.

The 1871 Census recorded:
Portreath, Cornwall,
Annie Deason, Head (of household), married, occupation: Master Mariner’s wife, age: 40 years, born: Illogan, Cornwall
Lillie P Deason, daughter, scholar, age: 6 years, born: Illogan, Cornwall
John H Deason, son, occupation: scholar, age: 4 years, born: Illogan, Cornwall
Grace D Deason, daughter, age: 1 year, born: Illogan, Cornwall
Catherine Andrew, unmarried, occupation: General Servant (Domestic), age: 20 years, born: Illogan, Cornwall.
Note: John was not recorded as he was likely to have been at sea.

John was master of the barque Harmodius from 1867 until at least 1878. The ship initially plied the London (Gravesend), England to Brisbane, Australia route carrying general cargo and occasional passengers and is known to have made 10 voyages to Brisbane under the command of John Deason; commencing with her maiden voyage in 1867. The Harmodius appeared in Australian waters for the last time under the command of John Deason in 1878; arriving into Melbourne from Mauritius, then proceeding to Newcastle, finally departing there bound for San Francisco.

During the period 1867/1882 the Brisbane Courier newspaper provided much detail of John’s voyages, the ships’ cargoes (inward and outward) as well as John’s own business interests. It is clear from those reports that John was well-known and liked in Brisbane.

John’s wife, Elizabeth and ‘children’ are recorded as being on board the Harmodius for the voyages of:
• 1868/1869 – notes “Mrs & Miss Deason”; the child probably daughter, Elizabeth who would have been about 3 years old at the time; there was no mention of son, John, who would have been 2 years old;
• 1871/1872 – notes “Mrs Deason and child”; the child may have been, Elizabeth who would have been about 6 years old, John, about 4 years or Grace, about 2 years. Youngest child, Thomas, was born on the return voyage;
Note : it is possible that all the children were on board and not recorded or individually listed as ‘passengers’ as reported in the Brisbane Courier. (For more information on voyages refer later pages).

After the 1872 voyage the family moved from Cornwall to Wales where they lived in a house on Bryn Rd, Swansea.

The 1881 Census recorded:
121,120 119 & 118 Bryn Road, Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales:
John Deason, head (of household), married, age: 45 years, occupation: Cork Merchant, born: Penzance, Cornwall
Annie Deason, wife, married, age: 46 years, occupation: wife, born: Illogan, Cornwall
John Deason, son, age: 14 years, occupation: scholar, born: Illogan, Cornwall
Grace Deason, daughter, age: 12 years, occupation: scholar, born: Illogan, Cornwall
Thomas Deason, son, age: 8 years, occupation: scholar, born: at sea
Mary Thomas, unmarried, age: 17 years, domestic general servant, born: Curnammon, Carmarthenshire.
Notes:
• census record contains a notation regarding the Bryn street address which is unclear. Possibly the Deason home occupied four allotments.
• this address is in the Swansea suburb of Brynmill.

By the early 1880s John was master of the barque Palestine which voyaged to Queensland 1881/1882. It was during this time that John took ill and was unable to continue his command. He returned to Sydney on 5 April 1882 as a passenger on the Egmont and is recorded in April as leaving Melbourne for London on the Clyde. (For more information on voyages refer later pages).

During the period 1887/1889 John is again noted as being in Australian waters – this time on the Cloncurry – together with his son, John Henry. Records of the 1887 voyage note John as master and John Henry, 3rd mate; the 1889 voyage again notes John as master and John Henry as 4th mate. There is no record of Annie or son, Thomas Francis, on the 1887/1889 voyages, and no record has been located regarding this ship’s return voyages. (For detailed information on these voyages refer later pages).

However, there is a record of ‘uncollected mail’ for a ‘Captain John Deason’ in Brisbane, June 1890 and John was not at home in London with Annie at the time of the 1891 Census: he may have still been in Australia or at sea. Further, it is possible that John may be the Mr “Deason” & “Dearson” recorded on three arrivals into Sydney during 1890-1893:
o 9 June 1890, arrived Sydney from Melbourne, on board the Barcoo. Travelling: saloon passenger;
o 22 June 1890, arrived Sydney from Brisbane, on board the Burwah. Travelling: saloon passenger, port of departure: Brisbane; and
o 9 May 1893, arrived Sydney (departure port not recorded), on board the Tambo. Travelling: saloon passenger.

The 1891 Census recorded:
61 Windsor Road, Forest Lodge, West Ham, London:
Annie Deason, head (of household), married, age: 48 years, occupation: none stated, born: Illogan, Cornwall
Grace Deason, daughter, unmarried, age: 24 years, occupation: none stated, born: Illogan, Cornwall
Thomas Deason, son, unmarried, age: 21 years, occupation: broker’s cashier, born: not stated
Martha Allean, unmarried, age: 17 years, occupation: domestic servant, born: Huntingdon

By 1891 son, John Henry, was settled in Brisbane and by 1894 younger son, Thomas, was settled in Perth, Western Australia. John and Annie probably returned to Swansea soon after 1891.

The 1901 Census recorded:
Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales – 56 Bryn Road:
John Deason, Head, age: 65 years, occupation: Retired Shipmaster, born: St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall
Anne Deason, Wife age: 70 years, born: name not clear, Cornwall.
Note: this address is in the Swansea suburb of Brynmill.

John died at his home, 56 Bryn Road, Brynmill, Swansea on 12 September 1904. Annie’s death was recorded in the South Wales Post as “Annie Deason, widow of Capt John Deason, aged 79, 23 Nov 1909, at 56 Bryn Road, Swansea”.


Summary of John Deason’s voyages to Australia on the barque Harmodius:
(For detailed information refer later pages)

1st voyage (1867/1868) – departed London (Gravesend), 11 June 1867, arrived Brisbane 4 October 1867, departed Brisbane for London week ended 30 November 1867, arrived London, 16 May 1868;
2nd voyage (1868/1869) – departed London, 27 April 1868, Deal, 6 May 1868, arrived Brisbane, 7 September 1868, departed Brisbane for London about 16 December 1868, arrived London probably early 1869. Note: “Mrs & Miss Deason” accompanied John on this voyage. The child was probably daughter, Elizabeth who would have been about 3 years old at the time. There was no mention of son, John, who would have been 2 years old;
3rd voyage (1869/1870) – departed London (Gravesend), 4 June 1869, arrived Brisbane, 12 September 1869, departed Brisbane for London 21 December 1869, arrived London, probably early 1869;
4th voyage (1870/1871) – departed London, 7 August 1870, arrived Brisbane, 23 November 1870, departed Brisbane for London, about 21 January 1871, arrived London, probably early to mid-1871;
5th voyage (1871/1872) – departed London (Gravesend), 16 August 1871, arrived Brisbane, 17 December 1871, departed Brisbane for London, about 2 March 1872, arrived London, probably mid-1872. Note: “Mrs Deason and child” accompanied John on this voyage. The child could have been, Elizabeth who would have been about 6 years old, John about 4 years or Grace about 2 years. Their youngest child, Thomas, was born on the return voyage;
6th voyage (1872/1873) – departed London (Gravesend), 30 August 1872, arrived Brisbane, 1 January 1873, departed Brisbane for London, about 14 May 1873, arrived London, probably late 1873;
7th voyage (1873/1875) – departed London (Gravesend), 1 December 1873, arrived Brisbane, 7 April 1874, departed Brisbane for Cooktown about 26 May 1874, departed Cooktown for Brisbane, 2 July 1874, arrived Brisbane, 3 August 1874, departed Brisbane for London 23 October 1874, arrived London, probably about early 1875. Note: during October John appeared in Court as a result of problems that occurred with the shipment of cattle to Cooktown – John won the case;
8th voyage (1875/1876) – departed London, 20 April 1875, arrived Brisbane, about 11 September 1875, departed Brisbane, about 5 November 1875, arrived London, probably early 1876;
9th voyage (1876/1876) – departed London, 2 June 1876, arrived Brisbane, 4 October 1876, departed Brisbane, about 20 December 1876, arrived London, 27 April 1877;
10th voyage (1877/1878) – departed Mauritius, probably February 1878; arrived Melbourne, 17 March 1878, departed Melbourne 1 May 1878, arrived Newcastle, date not known, departed Newcastle for San Francisco 24 May 1878. No further information known.

Summary of voyage to Australia on the barque Palestine:
11th voyage (1881/1882) – departed London, about 5 September 1881, arrived Keppel Bay [Rockhampton], 28 December 1881, took on-board cargo from damaged ship Sir William Wallace. The Palestine departed Rockhampton, 20 March 1882, without John Deason – he was ill with diabetes. John returned to Brisbane (probably on the Egmont). Certainly he was on the Egmont when it departed Brisbane, 3 April 1882, bound for Sydney – noted as a ‘passenger’. John then proceeded to Melbourne where he is recorded in April as leaving for London on the Clyde – again recorded as a ‘passenger’.

Summary of voyage to Australia on the Cloncurry:
12th voyage (1887/1888) – departed, London, mid 1887, arrived Sydney, 31 December 1887. John’s son, John Henry, is also recorded on this voyage. Probably departed Sydney mid-1888.
13th voyage (1888/1889) – departed, London, late 1888, arrived Sydney, 5 March 1889. John’s son, John Henry, is also recorded on this voyage. Probably departed Sydney mid-1889.



Details of voyages to Australia:
During the period 1867 to 1882 the Brisbane Courier newspaper contained hundreds of references to Captain John Deason and the ships Harmodius and Palestine.

The following extracts have been selected as they provide a record of the voyage, the ships’ cargo (inward and outward) and John Deason’s business dealings. Wherever possible newspaper extracts are shown unabridged and in similar format – any additions/corrections utilise “[ ]”.

Some nautical terms and abbreviations require explanation:
The Start or Start Point – for the majority of voyages from Britain the term ‘the start’ refers to ‘The Lizard’ – a peninsula in Cornwall. All shipping in the English Channel was required to have a registered pilot take ships from their arrival and departing ports. For ships heading out into the Atlantic pilots normally boarded/disembarked at or around the The Lizard. Beyond this point, ship’s masters were responsible for their ships and timed their voyages to/from this point. Often voyages to London could be a week or so longer than recorded depending on the conditions in the Channel.
The Line – the Equator.
The Meridian – the meridian of Greenwich – O°
The Downs – waters off Deal, English Channel
The Roads – channels within Moreton Bay, Brisbane
Dead weight – heavy cargo [e.g. metal, cheeses] used as ballast in lower decks to stabilise ship – usually loaded first – lighter cargo stored on upper levels.

1st voyage – 1867-1868
The Brisbane Courier announced arrival:
ARRIVAL
October 4 – Harmodius, barque, 490 tons. Captain Deason, at Brisbane Roads, from London. Passenger: Mr Obbrad. J and G Harris, agents.

and reported a detailed description of the voyage:
This vessel arrived in Brisbane Roads on the evening of Friday last, October 4, after a passage of 112 days from Gravesend. She is an entirely new ship on her first voyage and although she made a long passage, has given evidence of her sailing powers more than once on the voyage. Throughout she was unfortunate in meeting with bad winds, and when the wind shifted to a favourable quarter it generally died away in a few hours. The following report was furnished to us by Captain Deason:-
The Harmodius left Gravesend on June 11, cleared the Start on the 16th and crossed the Line on the evening of July 13, in twenty-nine days twelve hours from Gravesend, having had ten days detention between 70 N and the Equator, passed the Island of Trinadad [sic – off coast of Brazil] at midnight on July 19. Thence to the Cape of Good Hope she had a continuance of the strong head winds, and did not pass the Meridian until August 14, twenty-six days after. In making the casting she had light winds and calms for several days after leaving the Cape, she then had strong gale from east, and afterwards westerly winds. The Island of Amsterdam was passed on September 1, and from there she was ten days to Cape Lueuin [Leeuwin], which she passed on the 11th. She passed through Bass Straits and cleared Deal Island [eastern Bass Strait] on September 28, at 8 am. From that she was fourteen days in making Cape Moreton [entrance to Moreton Bay/Brisbane], owing to the prevalence of northerly winds and a strong southerly set. On the coast the weather was very squally, with frequent thunder and hail storms. She rounded Cape Moreton on October 2, at 4 pm and anchored in the roads the same night.

While in the North-east Trades she passed the Blue Jacket ship from London to New Zealand: also, the Waverley, from Swansea to the Cape of Good Hope, off the Cape de Verdes. In 7 deg north she spoke the ship Europa, from Glasgow to Bombay.

Captain John Deason placed the following notice in the Brisbane Courier:
Barque Harmodius
Notice – I hereby notify that I will not be RESPONSIBLE for say DEBTS contracted by my crew.
JOHN DEASON, Master
Brisbane, October 8

Shipping Agents, J & G Harris placed the following notice in the Brisbane Courier:
Barque Harmodius
Captain [Deason], from London
Notice – All CLAIMS and ACCOUNTS against the above Vessel, in respect of her Inward Cargo, must be rendered in duplicate at the Office of the Undersigned, on or before noon, WEDNESDAY, 30th instant, or they will not be recognised.
J. & G. HARRIS, Agents
Wharf, Brisbane, October 25, 1867

Shipping Agents, J & G Harris placed the following advertisement in the Brisbane Courier:
HARMODIUS, A1 12 YEARS
FOR LONDON
To follow the Young Australia.
To Shippers of Wool, Cotton, Hides, and other Produce.
This splendid new vessel, will be ready to receive her Homeward Freight immediately, and will have quick despatch, all her dead weight being engaged.
RATES OF FREIGHT:
Clean Wool and Cotton, 1d per lb., and 5 per cent.
Greasy Wool, ½d per lb., and 5 per cent.
Has first-rate accommodation for Saloon Passengers only – rate £55.
Wool and Cotton will be received in Ipswich and Brisbane by the undersigned, from whom all further information may be obtained.
Brisbane Agents
SMART, DONKIN & CO }

The Brisbane Courier reported on imminent departure:
DEPARTURES FOR LONDON
December 21 – Harmodius, barque, 491 tons, Captain J Deason, for London. Passenger: Wm Barwise.

and details of the outward cargo and its owners:
Harmodius, for London: 107 bales wool, 7 logs timber, 10,000 treenails, J and G Harris; 22 bales wool, J G Sims; 15 bales wool, W J E North; 34 bales wool, St George R Gore; 4 bales wool, A J S Bank; 62 bales wool, D Gunn; 50 bales wool, J F McDougall; 30 bales wool, F Bracker; 33 bales wool, Mount Hutton Company; 98 bales wool, Hodgson and Ramsay; 116 bales wool, 2 bales sheepskins, P F McDonald; 16 bales wool, Bank New South Wales; 35 bales wool, James Ivory; 67 bales wool, 403 hides, G H Wilson and Co; 34 bales wool, Macfarlane and Sons; 72 bales wool, Peel River Land and Mineral Co; 20 bales wool, David McConnel; 120 bales wool, 1 case, Gore and Co; 190 bales wool, McLean and Best; 9 bales wool, Wm Belt; 32 bales wool, 8 bales sheep-skins, R L Jenkins; 22 bales wool, J P Jost; 12 bales wool, A H Palmer; 2 bales wool; Joseph North; 16 bales wool, Major North; 5 bales wool, McIlwraith and Smyth; 84 bales wool, Smart, Donkin and Co; 138 bales wool, R Towns and Co; 23 bales wool, 3 cases arrowroot, Scott Dawson and Stewart; 1 case specimens, John Menzies; 3 drums dripping, 3 drums beef, 3 cases preserved meats, Orr and Honeyman; 1 case effects, L A Bernays; 1 box glass, Perry Brothers. Recapitulation: 1498 bales wool, 10 bales sheepskins, 403 hides, 10,000 treenails, 7 logs timber, 3 cases arrowroot, 4 cases sundries, 3 drums fat, 6 packages preserved meats.

The Brisbane Courier reported clearance of customs and ready to sail:
SHIPPING MATTERS
The fine clipper barque Harmodius cleared out at the Customs on December 17 for London, with an unusually large cargo for her tonnage. She takes 1598 bales of wool, and 10 bales sheep-skins, besides some small lots of sundries. She has become a favourite trader here, invariably landing her cargoes in the condition a vessel of her excellent construction should do – that is to say without a stain. We trust, for the sake of her excellent commander, Captain Deason, who is deservedly respected here, that she will meet with favouring winds, and make a passage worthy of her model and builders.

The Brisbane Courier reported on John Deason’s own wool purchases:
SHIPPING MATTERS
CLEARANCES
January 18. Royal Dane, Black Ball ship, 1616 tons, Captain L Davies, for London. …
… EXPORTS
Royal Dane, for London: ... Captain John Deason: 45 bales wool, …

4th voyage – 1870-1871
The Brisbane Courier announced departure from London:
VESSELS TO ARRIVE
Harmodius, 490, Deason, from London: to sailed August 7. Clarke, Hodgson, and Co, agents.

The Brisbane Courier announced arrival but without detailed description as per previous voyages:
ARRIVALS
November 23 – Harmodius, barque (Devitt and Moor’s line), 490 tons, Captain J Deason, from London. Passengers: Messrs James, Clayton (2), and Clarke. Clarke, Hodgson, and Co, agents.

Agents, Clarke, Hodgson & Co placed the following notice in the Brisbane Courier, 20 January 1871:
FIRST SHIP FOR LONDON
To Follow the Flying Cloud
The AA1 Clipper barque
HARMODIUS,
JOHN DEASON, Esq, Commander,
Will sail on or about SATURDAY, 21st instant. Has superior accommodation for a limited number of Saloon and Intermediate Passengers.
CLARKE, HODGSON & CO, Agents

5th voyage – 1871-1872
The Brisbane Courier announced departure from London:
ENGLISH SHIPPING
DEPARTURES
August 15 – Harmodius, 490 tons, Captain Deason, for Brisbane. Passenger: Mr Crawshay. Bright Brothers & Co, agents.
and details of the expected inward cargo and its value:
… Apparel and ready-made clothing, £30; blankets and flannels, £52; general drapery, £83; boots and shoes, £255; saddlery and leather goods, £660; cordage and twine, £14; paints and varnish, £200; glass, window and plate, £330; glassware, £53; earthenware, £100; paperhanging, £190; paper, 140 cwt.; stationery, £180; books, £370; hardware and ironmongery, £1190; machinery, £5630; upholstery and furniture, £360; pianos and musical instruments, £120; toys and fancy goods, £140; oilman’s stores and provisions, £2240; bacon and hams, 20 cwt.; cheese 30 cwt.; salt fish £440; candles, 62 cwt.; oils, 880 gallons; perfumery, £20; corks, 60 lbs.; salt, 15 tons; coffee 1860 lbs.; fruits and spices, 590 cwt.; sugar, 20 cwt.; confectionery £300; chemicals, £250; drugs, £200; agricultural seed, £21; beer in bulk, 14 barrels; beer in glass, 110 barrels; brandy, 3604 gallons; British spirits, 310 gallons; geneva, 1369 gallons; red and white wine, 112 gallons; bar and rod iron, 30 tons; galvanised iron, 10 tons; hoop iron, 13 tons; sheet and plate iron, 2 tons; shot, 1 ton; nails, bolts and nuts, 18 tons.

The Brisbane Courier announced arrival:
ARRIVALS
December 17 – Harmodius, barque, 490 tons, Captain J Deason, from London. Passengers – Saloon: Mrs Deason and child, Mr Crawshay. Second Cabin: Mrs and Miss Barr.

and reported a detailed description of the voyage:
The fine barque Harmodius has again reached Brisbane, after a tedious passage of 121 days from Gravesend and 116 days from the Lizard, the delay being caused principally by light winds and calms. She left Gravesend on the 16th August, and the Lizard on the 21st; experienced light westerly breezes for several days, followed by light north-easterly winds throughout the trades, which were lost in 11 degrees north; from thence had light squally weather to the Line, which was crossed on September 22, 32 days from the Lizard. Light S E trades prevailed to 21 degrees south, followed by squally weather from E S E and E; rounded the Cape October 22, 62 days out, and had fine pleasant weather to the meridian of St Paul’s. From November 9 to 20th encountered continued head winds, easterly, and calms, and subsequently light variable winds to King’s Island, which was sighted November 29; from thence to Sydney had nothing but light northerly winds and calms, and from Sydney to Cape Moreton, which was sighted at 9:30 am; on Friday had light south-easterly winds. Rounded Cape Moreton the same afternoon, and was towed up the river by the Francis Cadell yesterday. The Harmodius is still in charge of her esteemed commander, Captain Deason, who has now, we believe, completed his fifth voyage to this port.


The Brisbane Courier reported imminent departure and outward cargo:
SHIPPING
CLEARED
March 2 – Harmodius, barque, 490 tons, Captain Deason, for London. Passengers: Mr Warde and 4 in steerage.
Note: although there is only mention of ‘Mrs Deason and child’ on the inward voyage (refer above – arrival 17 December) it is possible that all three children (Elizabeth (about 7 years), John (about 5 years) and Grace (about 3 years)) were on board as the outward voyage noted “4 in steerage” without naming them.

and details of the outward cargo and its owners:
Harmodius, barque for London: 201 bales wool, Wienholt, Brothers; 500 bags bone dust, 450 dozen midgen canes, 15 cases honey, 3 bales sheepskins, 1 cask beeswax, 3 bales cotton, 241 bales wool, Clarke, Hodgson, and Co; 9 packages effects, James Galloway; 93 bags ore, Warry and Marsh; 221 bales wool, E Wienholt; 59 bales wool, Moore and Turnbull; 114 bales wool, Bank of Australasia; 34 bales wool, 1 bale skins, M H Marsh; 90 bales wool, C J and E M Boyds; 154 bales wool, Bright Brothers and Co, 18 bales wool, T McIlwraith; 49 bales wool, Milne and Co; 10 bales wool, G Raff and Co, 58 bales wool, H Donkin and Co; 36 bales wool, W Moore; 3 bales skins, G H Wilson and Co; 68 bales wool, M McKenzie; 6 cases specimens, N Bartley; 55 bales wool, North British Australian Company; 1 case arrowroot, S and G Grimes; 3 cases fossils, Secretary Public Works; 2 bales skins, 1 box lamp glasses, 140 bales wool, Cribb and Foots.

The Brisbane Courier reported, 26 April, on John Deason’s own shipment of produce:
SHIPPING
EXPORTS
Alfred Hawley, barque for London: … quantity bone dust, J Deason …

John and Annie’s youngest son, Thomas, was born on the return voyage to England, 22 June 1872, at Latitude 21.24 North and Longitude 35.9W (approximately 1000 kms west of the Canary Islands in the Atlantic).

6th voyage – 1872-1873
The Brisbane Courier announced departure from London:
VESSELS TO ARRIVE
Harmodius, barque, 490 tons, Captain Deason, from London; sailed August 30. Clarke, Hodgson, and Co., agents.

The Brisbane Courier announced imminent arrival:
ARRIVALS
At Cape Moreton
December 31 – Harmodius, barque, 490 tons, Captain Deason, from London, August 30. Clarke, Hodgson, and Co, agents.

and listed the Harmodius as ‘in harbour’.

The Brisbane Courier announced arrival:
VESSELS IN HARBOR – January 2
Barque Harmodius, 490 tons, Captain Deason, from London. Clarke, Hodgson, and Co, agents.

and reported a detailed description of the voyage:
The barque Harmodius left Gravesend on the 30th August, and commenced beating down the Channel on the 1st September; on the following day lost sight of land; and on the 29th September, in latitude 30.3 N, longitude 25.23 W, experienced a heavy gale from E S E; the Equator was crossed on the 15th October, 41 days out; on the 19th and 20th encountered a second gale in latitude 42 S, longitude 61 E and on the 30th of the same month a third severe gale from S S W and S, which split some of the canvas and caused the vessel to ship a large quantity of water. The gale lasted for 24 hours. Rounded Tasmania on the 15th December, and was baffled by strong head winds for more than a week; on the 22nd ultimo had a strong westerly gale with heavy squalls. Moreton Island was sighted on the morning of the 31st, and on the following day the Harmodius entered Moreton Bay, and took pilot on board, being towed up to Brisbane by the Francis Cadell yesterday morning. The following vessels were spoken during the passage: – September 7, the Coulnakyle, in latitude 47.8 N, longitude 10.30 W; September 13, a barque, signalled as TRBC, from Sunderland, bound to Point de Galle; September 14, brig Three Sisters, from Aberdeen; September 25, the Albert, for Rangoon, in latitude 23.07 N, longitude 22.42 W; October 2, Pride of Canada, of Glasgow, in latitude 11.43 N, longitude 24.40 W, this vessel was supplied with provisions; October 4, Lady Sampson, and Isabella, in latitude 9.40 N, longitude 24.25 W; October 22, ship Shanghai, 45 days out, from Liverpool to Calcutta; October 23, ship Middlesex, from London to Melbourne, 35 days out.

The Brisbane Courier, 14 May 1873, reported imminent departure and gave brief description of the outward cargo:
SHIPPING MATTERS
The barque Harmodius will probably clear today for London, with a full general cargo, comprising wool, tallow, hides, preserved meats, tin and copper ore, &c.

7th voyage – 1873-1875
The Brisbane Courier announced arrival:
SHIPPING
ENTERED INWARDS
April 7 – Harmodius, barque, Captain Deason from London. Passengers: 3 in steerage.
Note: there is insufficient information to indicate whether the ‘steerage’ passengers were members of John Deason’s family.

and reported a detailed description of the voyage:
The barque Harmodius, from London, was sailed up to the wharf at an early hour yesterday. Captain Deason reports that she left London on the 1st December, Gravesend on the 2nd, and anchored in the Downs on the 4th; on the 5th left the Downs, and anchored off Folkestone for a tide – the wind being light, weather foggy, and barometer reading at 30.65 in; arrived off the Start, and landed pilot on the 8th; left the Lizard on the 9th, and had light winds and calms to Madeira, which was passed on the 22nd December; from thence had light north-east trades, and lost them in 5° N and 24° W; from 5° N, to the Line experienced a strong northerly current from sixty to eighty miles per day; crossed the Line on the 15th January, in 25°30’ W, 37 days out; after leaving the south-east trades had nothing but light winds and calms to 44° S, and 18° E; had light winds to 100° E, and ran easting down in 46° S; passed Tasmania on the 21st March, 102 days from the Lizard; had south-east winds to Sydney; from thence to Moreton Island light north-east and easterly winds; sighted Cape Moreton on Tuesday, the 1st April, at 5 pm; hove-to till day light, when Pilot Shell came on board at 10 am and anchored at the bar at midnight. On the 26th March spoke to barque India, from Hobart Town to Port Curtis. During the voyage a passenger named William Knife Edge, jumped overboard and was drowned. Although the life buoy was at once thrown to him he deliberately refused to avail himself of its assistance, and forced his head under water until he sank. The second officer, M’Genuis, and a seaman named Tradup, jumped overboard in the most plucky manner and endeavoured to rescue the drowning man, but without avail as he sank before they could reach him. The deceased had been a photographer residing in Manchester, and had not, as far as is known, any friends in the colonies. Captain Deason forwarded to England full particulars of the occurrence by yesterday’s mail.

Agents, George Raff & Co placed the following advertisement in the Brisbane Courier, 27 April 1874:
FOR ENDEAVOUR RIVER
The English A1 Clipper Barque
HARMODIUS
491 tons register, J DEASON, Master, will be despatched for above port (should sufficient inducement offer) on or about WEDNESDAY, April 30, carrying passengers, horses, and cargo. Intending passengers are requested to engage at once.
GEORGE RAFF & CO, Agents
Passengers and Horses booked by Messrs WALLACE BARNETT & CHESTER.

The Brisbane Courier reported clearance of customs and ready to sail:
CLEARED
May 26 – Harmodius, barque, 419 tons, Captain Deason, for Cooktown. Passengers: Mr Hoyles, and 6 deck passengers.
Note: there is insufficient information to indicate whether the ‘deck’ passengers were members of John Deason’s family.

The Brisbane Courier reported imminent departure:
… the Harmodius, Captain Deason, was to leave for this port [Brisbane] the following day [i.e. leave Cooktown 2 July].

The Brisbane Courier, 30 July 1874, reported on progress:
The Harmodius, barque, Captain Deason, from Cooktown to Brisbane, anchored in Keppel Bay [Rockhampton] on Thursday afternoon.
Note: it must have been delayed or ran into difficulties as the Harmodius was sighted much later on its return to Brisbane.

The Brisbane Courier announced arrival:
SHIPPING
August 3 – Harmodius, barque, 490 tons, Captain J Deason, from Cooktown. G Raff and Co, agents.

The Brisbane Courier, 13 October 1874, reported on the drama that had occurred on the voyage to Cooktown and John Deason’s ensuing Court battle:
NEWS
… At the Metropolitan District court yesterday, before Mr Judge Paul and a jury of four, the case of John Deason v John Phillip Jost was partly heard. The plaintiff, who is captain of the ship Harmodius, sues Mr Jost, butcher, for £130, alleged to be due as freight for twenty-six head of cattle placed on board his ship for conveyance to Cooktown. Mr Garrick, instructed by Mr Macpherson, appeared for the plaintiff; and Mr McDevitt, instructed by Mr Main, for the defendant. The defendant enters a plea, in the first place, that he never was indebted as alleged; secondly, that he intends to rely upon a set-off to the plaintiff’s claim, that £93 3s of the money claimed has already been received by the plaintiff; and as a third plea, it is urged that the cattle were carelessly and negligently shipped and carried, and were so injured in consequence as to be of no use to the defendant, and the defendant claims in respect of this damage £90, which he is willing to set-off against the plaintiff’s claim. The second plea of £93 3s, having been paid already was tacitly acknowledged by Mr Garrick on behalf of the plaintiff, and the sum really at issue was reduced to £36 17s. The principal witness examined yesterday was the plaintiff, who gave evidence as to the existence of a verbal agreement between himself and defendant, and produced letters showing the nature of the agreement. According to the evidence of Captain Deason, it appeared that about the 8th May last complainant went to Mr Jost’s shop in company with Mr Shaw, Raff and Co’s manager, to see about some cattle belonging to Jost that were to go to the Endeavour River [Cooktown]. Jost wished plaintiff to go into partnership with him in the matter and share the profit or loss; but Deason said he could not speculate with the owner’s money, but would carry the cattle on freight. Eventually Jost came to the agreement that he would ship thirty head at £5 each, the ship to find fittings and water and to carry a man free of charge to Cooktown and back to look after the cattle, Jost to find fodder. Afterwards defendant said he would not be responsible for the cattle while they were in the yards at Lytton, where they were to be shipped; but Deason after seeing the yards, accepted the responsibility. Defendant subsequently wished plaintiff to sign an agreement stipulating that the cattle were to be landed in a specified time, and in safety; but Deason would have nothing to do with that agreement, saying that he wished to abide by the verbal agreement already made. Mr Jost further required that his agent – a Mr Mort – should receive a cabin passage instead of the passage to be given to the man who was to look after the cattle. This latter alteration was conceded. Thirty head of cattle arrived at Lytton, where the ship was, on the 26th May, and they were all taken on board with the exception of four, which escaped from the yards; these four were paid by the plaintiff according to agreement. The cattle were hoisted on board by the horns, which Deason said, according to his experience, was the usual way. The cattle were very wild. The horns of three of them were broken, and a good deal of trouble was experienced with them. The vessel proceeded to sea soon after shipping the cattle. The weather was very fine, there being only one night of heavy weather; but the cattle refused to eat or drink, and, after consulting Mr Jost’s agent, Captain Deason anchored under an island and sent a boat ashore for some grass for them. However, nineteen died on the voyage up, and on arrival at Cooktown the surviving animals were in such a state that, after asking Mr Mort’s advice, and being told by that gentleman that he had no instructions, the plaintiff handed the cattle over to the agent for sale in Cooktown, considering that the best thing to do in the interest of all parties. The cattle realised £73 3s, and some hay belonging to the defendant, which was also sold, realised £20. This money was the £93 3s acknowledged to have been received by the plaintiff. Captain O’Reilly was examined as to the usage in the port of Brisbane, when no agreement exists, by which time of payment of freight on live stock is regulated. After some demur to the question on the part of the defence, it was elicited from Captain O’Reilly that, as far as his experience went, it was customary, for reasons which he stated, to pay the freight on live stock at the time of shipment. He also testified that shipping cattle by the horns was usual method of taking them on shipboard, and as good as any other he knew of. The court adjourned at half-past 4 till 10 o’clock this morning, when the hearing of the case will be resumed. …

The Brisbane Courier , 14 October 1874, reported on the continuing Court case involving John Deason:
NEWS
… At the Metropolitan District court, yesterday, the hearing of the case of Deason v Jost was continued during the whole day. The examination of witnesses for the plaintiff was finished during the morning. The first witness examined was John Mort, who was to have acted as Jost’s agent for the sale of the cattle at Cooktown, and had promised that he would keep an eye on them during the voyage. The distance the cattle were travelled to the ship he judged to be about sixty miles, namely, from Franklyn Vale to Lytton. He also gave evidence as to the rate at which stock were usually driven, and as to the manner in which the cattle in question were treated at Lytton. He said he had examined the first of the cattle that had died, and it was his opinion that the cause of death was excessive exertion in being over-driven and the excitement of being shipped immediately afterwards. The rest of the evidence of this witness was principally confirmatory of that of Captain Deason. The next witness, Henry Shaw, gave evidence of the verbal agreement, which coincided with that of plaintiff on the preceding day: witness also confirmed the evidence previously given by Captain O’Reilly that it was a usage of the port, when agreement was silent on the subject, to pay freight on live stock at time of shipment. Mr Shaw said he had gone in company with plaintiff to Jost’s house asking for a cheque for amount of freight before the ship left for Cooktown, which had been refused. Robert Craig, ship-broker, being examined, also continued the evidence of previous witnesses as to the time at which the freight on live stock is payable. This closed the case for the plaintiff. Mr McDevitt, in opening to the jury the case for the defendant, said that he would be able to bring evidence to rebut the statement that the cattle were killed by over-driving. Mr Mort had stated that the cattle had died by violence, said he would be able to show that they must have suffered that violence whilst in the plaintiff’s charge. Under these circumstances he considered the defendant entitled to ask for a verdict for the value of the cattle, in addition to the refundment of the £93 3s already received by the plaintiff. The first witness called for the defence was Mr Ernest White, squatter, who said that fat cattle might be driven twenty miles per day with safety by a good drover: fifteen or twenty miles was a fair thing. He also gave evidence that, in his experience, cattle were usually shipped by means of slings passed under the belly. Michael Goodwin, foreman for the Co-operative Butcher’s Company, being examined, said he considered eighteen to twenty miles a day fair travelling for stock in the month of May. Joseph Flannigan, drover of the cattle in question from Franklyn Vale to Lytton, gave evidence as to the time occupied in the journey; they were four days on the road, and from a statement made by this witness, it appeared that they did not travel more than twelve or thirteen miles on any one day, and that the cattle were driven very quietly. Flannigan gave a detailed account of the shipping of the cattle, stating that the embarkation of the first bullock occupied two hours during which time the animal remained in the water as it had been swum out to the ship, and there was not sufficient power to hoist it up. The others were shipped much more rapidly, and were hoisted by the horns. After all were on board, witness went to look at them, and found many of them bruised, and all except four were more or less injured in the horns. The Court was adjourned shortly after 5 pm, till 10 o’clock this morning. …

The Brisbane Courier, 16 October 1874, reported on the continuing Court case involving John Deason and its conclusion – John Deason won the case:
NEWS
… The case of Deason v Jost was brought to a close in the District Court yesterday. Some additional rebutting evidence was brought forward on behalf of the plaintiff, and the counsel on both sides addressed the jury at considerable length. His Honor, in summing up, said the first question to be considered by the jury was as to what was the contract, and referred to the facts on this point, as elicited in evidence. A very important point to decide, in connection with this, was whether the defendant agreed to pay the freight for the cattle on their shipment at Brisbane or upon their being landed at Cooktown. The general law was that freight was payable on the arrival of the commodity in question at the port of destination: but this might be over-ridden if a special agreement were come to. He pointed out that if the contract were silent, the terms would be guided by the usage of the port, and went over the evidence that had been given as to the usual practice. But if the jury came to the conclusion that a special agreement was entered into, then they must put aside the question of usage altogether. If, according to the terms of the contract, the freight was payable on shipment, then the plaintiff would be entitled to claim freight for the whole of the cattle shipped, whether they were taken to their port of destination or not, or even if they were treated with negligence on the passage; but if, on the contrary, they found that the contract was for the payment of £5 per head for cattle landed in Cooktown, then the freight claimed could only be £35, for the seven head that were so landed. He next referred to the plea set up by the defendant – which was to all intents and purposes a cross action – for the value of the cattle lost on the voyage, and said that if the cattle were shipped merely under the implied contract that the plaintiff was to take due and proper care of them (there being no bills of lading in this case), then if he did not take that care, and they were lost through his negligence, he would be liable for the value of those lost – that was, for the £142 claimed by defendant. His Honor also dwelt upon the question as to whether the cattle had been properly shipped, reading over the evidence, and pointing out the liability of the captain under the circumstances. If the plaintiff had used them in such a manner as to unnecessarily cause them injury, then the jury, before giving damages against him, would have to find that the cattle died from those injuries, or from those injuries and ultimate negligence combined. His Honor concluded by stating the different amounts of damages that would have to be given, according to the decision which they might arrive at. The jury, after an absence of nearly half an hour, returned a verdict for the plaintiff for £36 17s, which was the full amount claimed. Costs were allowed on the higher scale. Mr McDevitt, on behalf of the defendant, gave notice of his intention to move for a new trial.


There is no evidence of another trial: John Deason appears to have won the case.

The Brisbane Courier reported clearance of customs and ready to sail:
CLEARED
October 16 – Harmodius, barque, 490 tons, Captain J Deason, for London. Passengers: Miss Eliza Hunt, Mr George Crawshaw, and 2 in the intermediate. G Raff and Co, agents.
Note: there is insufficient information to indicate whether the ‘intermediate’ passengers were members of John Deason’s family.

and reported a detailed description of the voyage:
Harmodius, barque, for London: 58 bales wool, 1292 ingots tin (50 tons 2 cwt. 2 qtrs.), G Raff and Co; 20 bales wool, 13 bales cotton, 821 hides, 595 ingots tin (22 tons 13 cwt. 2 qtrs. 3 lbs.), Clarke, Hodgson and Co; 80 cases preserved meat, Hogarth Meat Preserving Co; 287 ingots tin (10 tons 7 cwt. 3 qtrs. 25 lbs.), W and F Snelling; 17 bales wool, R Lewin and Co; 27 bales wool, J and G Harris; 14 bales wool, Mercantile Bank; 282 bales wool, Kent and Wienholt; 71 bales wool, Marshall and Slade; 92 bales wool, Gere and Co; 11 bales wool, Wienholt Brothers; 14 bales wool, G H Wilson and Co; 52 bales wool, J F McDougal; 44 bales wool, North British Australian Co; 126 bales wool, Hodgson and Ramsay; 22 bales cotton, Cribb and Foote; 215 bales wool, Bell and Sons; 120 bales wool, Shanahan and Jennings; 31 bales wool, 1 package, Bright Brothers and Co; 71 bales wool, C H Green; 7 bales wool, New Zealand and Australian Land Co; 193 bales wool, G H Davenport; 4 cases sundries, R Hutchins and Co; 1 package, R P Adams.

The Brisbane Courier reported imminent departure:
DEPARTURE
October 23 – Harmodius, barque, 490 tons, Captain J Deason, for London. G Raff and Co, agents.

8th voyage – 1875-1876
The Brisbane Courier, 16 June 1875, reported on departure from London:
VESSELS TO ARRIVE
Harmodius, barque, 491 [tons], Captain W [sic] Deason, from London for Brisbane: sailed April 20, Bright Brothers and Co, agents.

Agents Bright Brothers & Co, and others, placed the following advertisement in the Brisbane Courier, 11 September 1875:
DEVITT & MOORE’S LINE,
FOR LONDON

THE HARMODIUS, 490 tons, JOHN DEASON, Master, is now DISCHARGING her inward cargo, and will be despatched as above on or about 15th October next.
For particulars of rates of freight and passage money apply to
BRIGHT BROTHERS & CO, }
GEO RAFF & CO } Agents
CLARKE, HODGSON &CO }

The Brisbane Courier, 5 November 1875, reported on imminent departure:
SHIPPING NEWS
… The regular trader Harmodius, barque, of Devitt and Moore’s line, being fully laden with a cargo of wool and other produce, cleared with the Customs yesterday afternoon for London, and will be towed to the Bay today, it being Captain Deason’s intention to proceed to sea, if possible, in the course of tomorrow. The vessel, which is in excellent trim, has stowed the whole of her cargo alongside the agent’s wharf, and, with a fair share of favourable weather, there is every ?practice? [unclear] of Captain Deason arriving in ample time for the London February wool sales.

9th voyage – 1876-1877
The Brisbane Courier reported on departure from London:
ENGLISH SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
June 2 – Harmodius, barque (Devitt and Moore’s line), 491 [tons], Captain Deason, for Brisbane. Passengers: Messrs Routledge, Redman and castle. Passed Deal June 7. Consigned to Messrs Bright Brothers and Co.

The Brisbane Courier announced arrival:
ARRIVALS
October 4 – Harmodius, barque (Devitt and Moore’s line), 419 tons, Captain Deason, from London, June 2; Deal, June 7. Passengers: Messrs Routledge, Redman, and castle. Bright Brothers and Co, agents.

And reported briefly on the inward cargo:
… The well known and regular trader of Messrs Devitt and Moor’s Line, the Harmodius, barque, which is still under the command of Captain Deason, arrived of Cape Moreton from London yesterday morning , and consequently came to an anchor inside the Cape. The vessel which brings a general cargo, valued, at the time of clearance at £28,100, is consigned to Messrs Bright Brothers and Co. …

An advertisement on the same page gave an indication of the inward cargo:
Ex Harmodius, barque, from London, 49 cases claret, Parbury, Lamb and Co.

The Brisbane Courier, 26 October 1874, another advertisement gave a further indication of the ship’s inward cargo:
THIS DAY
3 DOZEN MEN’S HALF-STIFFENED DRAB FELT HATS
Ex Harmodius, Deason, Master, from London
… Arthur Marin will sell at auction, at the City Auction Mart, on THURSDAY, October 26, at Eleven o’clock … … No reserve. Terms – Cash.

The Brisbane Courier reported on imminent departure:
SHIPPING
CLEARED
December 20 – Harmodius, barque (Devitt and Moore’s line),491 tons, Captain J Deason, for London. No passengers. Bright Brothers and Co, agents.

and details of the outward cargo and its owners:
EXPORTS
Harmodius, barque, for London: 562 bales wool, Bell and Sons; 79 bales wool, Commercial Banking Company; 211 bales wool, G Clark; 27 bales wool, A Beazley; 20 bales wool, Raff, Robertson, and Co; 107 bales wool, Hodgson and Ramsay; 26 bales wool, Australian Joint Stock Bank; 46 bales wool, J A Porter; 11 bales wool, H Stevens and Co; 12 bales wool, J S McIntyre; 21 bales wool, G Raff and Co; 11 bales wool, W Sloane and Co; 113 bales wool, B D Morehead and Co; 98 bales wool, Mylne and Co; 33 bales wool, J Tyson; 80 bales wool, North British Australian Company; 84 bales wool, J F McDougall; 20 bales wool, Scottish Australian Investment Company; 97 bales wool, G H Davenport; 33 bales wool, Lord and Co; 1 case, W R Alexander; 1 case J F Buckland; 300 ingots tin, W and F Snelling. Recapitulation: 1723 bales wool, 11½ tons ingot tin.

The Brisbane Courier, 30 June 1877 reported on arrival in London:
ENGLISH SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
(from April 13 to May 11)
Arrivals at London
… April 27 – Harmodius, barque, 491 tons, Captain Deason, from Brisbane. Cleared Cape Moreton, December 28. Passage 119 days.

10th voyage – 1878
There is no information on how and when the Harmodius reached Mauritius. It is likely to have departed London late 1877.

The Brisbane Courier reported on arrival Melbourne:
SHIPPING
… The Harmodius, barque, Captain J Deason, who has many friends in this port, arrived at Melbourne, from Mauritius, on March 17.

The Brisbane Courier reported departure from Melbourne, 1 May 1878:
SHIPPING
… The Harmodius, barque, sailed from Melbourne for Newcastle yesterday morning [‘yesterday’ – i.e. 1 May 1878]

The Brisbane Courier reported departure from Newcastle:
SHIPPING
… The Harmodius, barque, sailed from Newcastle for San Francisco on Friday last [‘Friday last’ – i.e. 24 May 1878]

There is no information on the remainder of the voyage. The Harmodius did not return to Australia again under the command of Captain John Deason.

11th voyage – 1882
The Brisbane Courier reported on arrival Keppel Bay [Rockhampton]:
ARRIVALS
In Keppel Bay
December 28 – Palestine, barque, 598 tons, Captain Deason, from London 6th August. Passenger: Saloon – Mr W H Holding. Walter Reid and Co, agents.

and in the same issue reported:
ROCKHAMPTON
(from our correspondent)
The barque Palestine, 144 days out from London, with a general cargo, anchored in Keppel Bay this afternoon.

Brisbane Courier, 15 March 1882, reported the ship, Sir William Wallace, in trouble, and transfer of its cargo to the Palestine. In addition, the Palestine’s Captain, John Deason, was ill:
ROCKHAMPTON
(from our correspondent)
… The barque Sir William Wallace, which was compelled to put back into Keppel Bay in consequence of springing a leak, has been relieved of 400 tons of her cargo, which has been transferred to the Palestine. The later ship will shortly sail for London, but, it is feared, without her captain. Captain Deason has been suffering for several days from a severe attack of diabetes, and at one time his life was despaired of. This news will be heard with regret by Mr Deason’s many friends in Brisbane. The Sir William Wallace will sail next week for the metropolis for repairs.

The Brisbane Courier – reported the Palestine had cleared customs and was ready to sail:
(from our own correspondent)
ROCKHAMPTON
… The Palestine, barque, cleared for London on Monday, taking 870 tons manure, a portion of which was transhipped from the Sir William Wallace, in addition to bones, &c. [‘Monday’ – i.e. 21 March 1882].

The Brisbane Courier reported on departure of Egmont for Sydney and passenger – Captain Deason:
DEPARTURES
April 3 – Egmont, ASN Company’s s [steamer], 456 tons, Captain W Beal, for Sydney. Passengers: … Captain Deason …

SHIPPING MOVEMENTS – Queensland
… Egmont s[teamer], left yesterday [3 April] morning, departed from the Bar at 10:30 am and is due in Sydney to-morrow [5 April] morning. She leaves on Thursday afternoon for Brisbane, Maryborough, and Rockhampton.

It is possible that the Egmont originated in Rockhampton (given that it was returning there) and that John Deason joined it there for the voyage to Brisbane and on to Sydney. The Egmont departed Brisbane, 3 April 1882 and arrived Sydney, 5 April 1882 where he was recorded as a ‘passenger’. Later, John is recorded again as a ‘passenger’ leaving Melbourne, 13 April 1882 bound for London on the Clyde.

12th voyage (1887/1888)
New South Wales shipping arrival/immigration records note John as arriving Sydney, 31 December 1887, from London, on the Cloncurry, as ship’s master, age: 53 years and from Cornwall. The same record notes John’s son, John Henry, as 3rd mate, age: 20 years and from Swansea, [Wales]. This record makes no mention of any other family members being on board. No record has been located regarding the ship’s return voyage; however, it must have been in 1888 given that the ship returned to Sydney in early 1889.

13th voyage (1888-1889)
New South Wales shipping arrival/immigration records note John as arriving Sydney, 5 March 1889, from London, on the Cloncurry, as ship’s master, age: 53 years and from Cornwall. The same record notes John’s son, John Henry, as 4th mate, age: 21 years and from Cornwall. This record makes no mention of any other family members being on board. No record has been located regarding the ship’s return voyage; however, it is likely to have been in mid-1889.


Later voyages (1890-1893)
It is possible that John was in Australia during 1890 and 1893; he could be the Mr “Deason” & “Dearson” recorded as arriving Sydney:
o 9 June 1890, from Melbourne, on board the Barcoo. Travelling: saloon passenger;
o 22 June 1890, from Brisbane, on board the Burwah. Travelling: saloon passenger, port of departure: Brisbane; and
o 9 May 1893, (departure port not recorded), on board the Tambo. Travelling: saloon passenger.

Notes for Annie Maria (Naney) (Nanny) (Spouse 1)

1871 Census:

Parish ILLOGAN; District 3; Schedule 024

Position Marital
Name in Family Status Age
ANDREW, CATH Servant U 20
DEASON, ANNIE Head M 40
DEASON, LILLIE P Daughter - 6
DEASON, JOHN H Son - 4
DEASON, GRACE D Daughter - 1


More info on above names:

Approximate
Birth
ANDREW, CATH GEN SV 1851 ILLOGAN, Cornwall
DEASON, ANNIE MARINERS WI 1831 ILLOGAN, Cornwall
DEASON, LILLIE P SCH 1865 ILLOGAN, Cornwall
DEASON, JOHN H SCH 1867 ILLOGAN, Cornwall
DEASON, GRACE D - 1870 ILLOGAN, Cornwall

1891 Census:
Civil parish:   West Ham
Ecclesiastical parish:   St Emmanuel
County:   Essex
 
Source information:   RG12/1334
Registration district:   West Ham
Sub registration district:   West Ham
ED, institution, or vessel:   75
Folio:   41
Page:   24

Annie Davey – early life
The 1841 Census recorded:
Little Nancekuke, Parish of Illogan, Cornwall:
William Davey, age: 74 years, occupation: farmer, born Cornwall
Thomas Davey, age: 42 years, occupation: farmer, born Cornwall
Grace Davey, age: 40 years, born Cornwall
William Davey, age: 15 years, born Cornwall
Jane Davey, age: 12 years, born Cornwall
Naney Davey, age: 11 years, born Cornwall
Note: it is possible that William Davey (age 74) was Thomas’s father.

The 1851 Census recorded:
Nancekuke, Parish of Illogan, Cornwall:
Thomas Davey, Head (of household), married, age: 51 years, occupation: farmer of 130 acres 7 labourers, born Illogan, Cornwall
Grace Davey, wife, married, age: 50 years, born Illogan, Cornwall
Jane Davey, daughter, unmarried, age: 22 years, occupation: farmers daughter, born Illogan, Cornwall
Nanny Davey, daughter, unmarried, age: 20 years, occupation: farmers daughter, born Illogan, Cornwall
Mary Elizabeth, daughter, unmarried, age: 9 years, occupation: farmers daughter, born Illogan, Cornwall; …


The 1861 Census recorded:
Nancekuke, Parish of Illogan, Cornwall:
Thos Davey, Head (of household), married, age: 62 years, occupation: farmer 84 acres employing 2 men 3 boys, born Illogan, Cornwall
Grace Davey, wife, married, age: 60 years, born Illogan, Cornwall
Jane Davey, daughter, unmarried, age: 22 years, occupation: farmers daughter, born Illogan, Cornwall
Annie Davey, daughter, unmarried, age: 28 years, born Illogan, Cornwall
Betsie, daughter, unmarried, age: 19 years, occupation: farmers daughter, born Illogan, Cornwall; …