Elinor Thomas (Montague) (c.1628 - 1659)

Birthplace: York, Virginia, United States
Death: Died

 

Eleanor "Ellen" Martha Thompson (Montague) (c.1633 - 1675) Icn_world

Birthplace: York, Virginia, USA
Death: Died

About Eleanor "Ellen" Martha Thompson (Montague)

Peter was married twice; his first wife's name is unknown, likely married in England. All of his children were by his first wife. Sometime after arriving in the colonies, he remarried Cecily, likely the daughter of Capt. Samuel Matthews with him Peter was closely associated.

His will dated in 1659 named his sons wife Cecily, sons Peter and William, his daughter Ellen, wife of William Thompson, and the daughter of his late daughter Ann Jadwin. These children were by his first wife, dates and name unknown. A court order in 1660 named his second wife, Cicely Montague, and her stepson, Peter Montague, as executors of the estate. -------------------- Ellen Montague was born 1632 in Nansemond, Virginia and died 27 Mar 1659 in Middlesex, Virginia.

Married:

  1. in 1679 in Nansemond, Virginia to William Thompson (abt. 1661-1701), son of Roger Thompson.

Children of Ellen Montague and William Thompson:

  1. Mary Thompson b. 1666 at New Kent VA and died 30 Nov 1712. She married in 1680 to James Day.
Nicknames: "Sisley Greene", "Cecily Reynolds", "Cicely Bayley", "Cecily Bailey", "Cecily Jordan", "Cicily Farrar ..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dorset, England
Death: Died

About Cecily Reynolds

Cicely Reynolds, born betw 1593 and 1604 in Dorset, England; died 1677 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA. She was also known as Sisley or Cesley Greene, Reynolds, Farrar, Jordan, Bayley, and Montague. She was awarded with the title of "Ancient Planter" of the Jamestown Colony in 1620.

She was on her own from the age of 11, and grew into the much-courted and many times married "Glamour Girl" of the Jamestown Colony. She had good friendships with women as well as men; and by the time she was 24 years old, due to the death of her husband Samuel Jordan, she owned outright a successful plantation, Jordan's Landing, one of only four to continue operation after the Indian Massacre of 1622. Both Samuel and Cicely earned the designation "Ancient Planter" by the London Company of Virginia.

Parents: Thomas Reynolds and Cicely Pippen (1593-?)

married:

  1. 1618 to Thomas Bayley or Bailey, thought to be the son of Samuel Bailey; Thomas was a member of the Governor's Guard stationed at Jamestown. He died of illness and in accordance with the custom of the Colony, Cecily promptly remarried.
  2. abt 1621 to Samuel Jordan (1590-1623) as his second wife.
  3. on May 02, 1625 in Jamestown, VA to Commissioner William Farrar.

marriages sometimes listed to Peter Montague and Thomas Parker are under discussion and not currently shown in the Geni tree. See below.

Children of Cicely Reynolds and Thomas Bailey:

  1. Temperance Bailey, born 1617 in Charles City County, VA; died 1647 in Charles City County, VA. married Lieutenant Colonel Richard Cocke, Sr., born Bef. September 05, 1602 in Stottesdon, Shropshire, England; died October 04, 1665 in Bremo, Henrico, VA. He was the son of John Cocke and Elizabeth. It is thought that Temperance was named in honor of Temperance West, Lady Yardley, wife of Governor George Yardley.

Children of Cicely Reynolds and Samuel Jordan:

  1. Mary Jordan, born 1621 in Jordan's Journey, VA; died Abt. 1670 in Henrico County, VA; married (1) Arthur Bailey 1654 in Henrico County, VA; married (2) Christopher Foster Aft. 1658 in Virginia.
  2. Margaret Jordon, born 1623 in Jordan's Journey, VA, after her father's death.

Children of William Farrar and Cicely Reynolds are:

  1. Col. William Farrar II, born 1626 in Jamestown, VA; died February 11, 1677/78 in Henrico Co., VA; married Mary Williams 1656.
  2. Cicely Farrar, born 1627 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died 1703; married Henry Sherman, Sr.
  3. Lt. Col. John Farrar, born 1631 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died March 1684/85 in Henrico Co., VA.

the quotable Miss Reynolds

Mr. Pooley maught thank himself for he might fared the better but for his own words." - Cecely Reynolds Baley Jordan Farrar, 1623

the invention of flirting in America

Cicely survived the Jamestown Massacre in 1622 by, as the story goes, standing firmly at her front door and refusing to move. The Powhatan Indians were impressed with her fortitude and beauty and let her live. That story seems a little far-fetched, but who knows?

Note: Records show that few lives were lost at Jordan's Journey during the Indian Massacre of 1622 -- Samuel Jordan's son was killed trying to warn neighbors -- and it was one of the four fortified plantations not abandoned after the massacre. In the dawn's darkness, William Farrer rowed as rapidly as he could from Farrer's Island to take refuge at Jordan's Journey. He was to stay at there for the next 6 years.

Within three or four days of Samuel Jordan’s death, Cicely agreed to become the wife of Rev. Greville Pooley. She was pregnant with Samuel Jordan’s child, so she asked that the engagement be kept secret. However, Rev. Pooley was so impressed that he had won Cicely’s hand that he spread the word. Not a good move, now a furious Cicely refused to go through with the wedding, causing the first "breach of contract" lawsuit in the Colonies. n.b. Quite wisely the Virginia House of Burgesses kicked the case over to London, and Cecily won.

Finally, at 59, Cicely Reynolds Bailey Jordan Farrar Montague married husband five, Thomas Parker. There were no children from this marriage, and Parker died three years later. Unfortunately, as was the case with many women, after this we lose records on Cicely. As a member of my mother’s family, I can surmise that, at this point, she had thick wavy white hair, a wry and dark sense of humor, and perfect grace.

Family Notes

  • from: The Sister of Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight VA?, by Susan E. Clement and Sybil R. Taylor © 1992 Reynolds Family Association

From the evidence examined to date, it appears that the first American genealogical writer of Cecily and Christopher was J.R.B. Ray in 1901. (The North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol II, No 4, Oct 1901. Repr Balto: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1979, pp135-136.) Unfortunately, Ray gave little in the way of sources for his information.

Ray appears to have found Cecily entrancing, and he wrote of the "Mysterious Cicely Jordan"

At or about the same time, if not on the same vessel, in the year 1611, a ten year old girl named Cicely Reynolds, and a comparatively young widower, who had left his small sons behind him in England, arrived at Jamestown in the Colony of Virginia.

The young widower was Samuel Jordan, who afterwards established a seat on the James River near its confluence with the Appomattox, which he called 'Jourdan's Jorney'. Almost contemporaneously with the coming of these two, but perhaps a year earlier, Sir Thomas Gates and his companions of the ill fated 'Sea Venture' had landed, among them being Capt. William Pierce."

"This was followed by Joane Pierce, the Captain's wife on the 'Blessing.' Capt. Pierce was a relative in some degree of the young girl Cicely Reynolds, and doubtless the advance arrival of Cicely was known to both Captain Pierce and his wife.

Besides, Samuel Jordan was a near-relative of Cicely and her mother's cousin, and still another cousin (of her mother) Silvester Jordan, came about the same time, so there was no lack of relatives to look after the ten year old child, whose mother, still living in Dorsetshire, for some reason had consented to her coming."

These sudden and swift transitions in the life of Cicely Reynolds were characteristic of one of such adventurous spirit as to undertake a long sea voyage into strange lands, even though accompanied by near relatives. She was ten years of age in 1611, and must have married her first husband ___ Bailey when but about 14 years old, as in 1623-4 her daughter Temperance was seven years of age. The Christian name of her first husband has not been found, but it is safe to say he was of the same family as the Samuel Bailey who is known to have married a grand-daughter of Capt. William Pierce, her relative.

The grandfather of Cicely Reynolds was Thomas Jordan, of Dorsetshire, England, grand daughter, the mother of Cicely married a Reynolds [sic]. Her mother's maiden name was Cicely Fitzpen or Phippen, and she was the daughter of Robert Phippen and his wife Cicely or Cicellie Jordan. Robert Phippen was the son of one Joseph Phippen, whose mother was Alice Pierce, and thus Ciceley Reynolds was related to Capt. William Pierce and his wife Joane. This last couple were the parents of Jane Pierce who married as his third wife another celebrated Virginia character -John Rolfe.

But to continue the story:

Samuel Jordan of Jordan's Jorney, became the second husband of this adventurous daughter of his first cousin Cicely Phippen.

"Twelve years later, her brother, Christopher Reynolds, arrived on the 'John and Francis' and may have discovered for the first time that his sister was then married to her second husband Samuel Jordan and the mistress of Jordan's Jorney, with a six year old daughter by her first husband, named Temperance Bailey..."

At their home on the James [River] he and his wife and their household survived the Indian uprising that occurred in 1622-23. But not long after that Samuel Jordan died.

Very shortly after the death of Samuel Jordan, of Jordan's Jorney, one of the legatees in the will of Abraham Persey, a certain Rev. Greville Pooly, vociferously "woed" the widow Cecily Jordan, who rejected his early advances on the ground that she was with child; but thereafter she married Capt. William Farrar, a prominent man of the Virginia Council. Thereupon the parson brought what has been called by Alexander Brown "the first breach of promise suit in America". The astute third husband, being a lawyer, succeeded in quashing the proceedings, and Parson Pooly went on his way. But the child was born.

Thus Cicely Reynolds had been married twice and was the mother of one child by each of her first two husbands. By Captain William Farrar, she became the mother of two sons Capt. William Farrar Jr and Lieut. Colonel John Farrar, of Henrico Co. [VA] who left no children and never married, so that the girl-emigrant thus became the ancestress of the numerous Farrars of VA, through her son William Farrar, Jr. Her third husband, Capt. (or Colonel) William Farrar died about 1635-6.

The history of 'Aunt Cecily' becomes obscured by the ascendancy of the Independents or Puritans. In that transition, the old plantation aristocracy of which she was a part lost power in the affairs of the Colony. But her original chaperon in America, Captain William Pierce (II) wound up on the winning team in that shuffle. So did her brother, Christopher Reynolds (III)." [23]

Discussion

  • Researchers have Cecily marrying for a fourth time to Peter Montague. Peter left a wife, Cecily , in his will proved 1 July 1659 in Lancaster county, Virginia. It is felt that Peter's first wife was Cecily Mathews, the daughter of Anthony Matthews. Many researchers state that Cecily Farrar had five children by Peter Montague.
  • After Peter's death, researchers say she married in 1660 Thomas Parker, who also left a wife Cecily. Thomas came in the Neptune with William Farrar in 1618 and on 23 January 1625 was at "College Land."
  • Said to have given birth to Samuel Jordan's posthumous son named Richard Jordan. This seems unlikely as the Jamestown Muster of 1624 reports her with three children (in a household of 37): Temperance Bailey, Mary Jordan and Margaret Jordan (b. 1623). Therefore Margaret is most likely the child born after Samuel Jordan's death. There is no further record of Margaret so presume died young.
  • Said to be the younger sister of Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight.
  • She is variously listed as a Fludd, a Greene, and most interestingly, as a street orphan swept up and sent to the Jamestown Colony. However the name "Cecily" runs in the Phippen family, and the connections to the Bailey and Jordan families, carried over in Jamestown, seem firmly rooted in Dorset. The real question is why a mother allows / sends her 11 year old child on such an adventure to Jamestown. That Cecily prospered materially -- she was a wealthy woman in her own name by age 24 -- seems an unlikely motivation, even for a family of merchant / adventurers.
  • Coldham, Peter Wilson, "The Complete Book of Emigrants" Baltimore, MD Genealogial Publishing Company 1988.
  • Holmes, Alvahn, "The Farrar's Island Family and its English Ancestry", Baltimore, MD , Gateway Press Inc. 1977
  • Nugent, Neil Marion, "Cavaliers and Pioneers" Baltimore, MD , Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983

Footnotes

  • [23] For a capsule description of the transition that cast the parliament and the King of England at loggerheads during this period, see White, Concise History of England, pages 93-97.
  • [497] According to the muster of the inhabdaitants of "Jorns Journey" Plantation taken the 21st of January 1624, Cecily Jordan was then aged 24 -- William Farrar (I) was 31, her daughter Temperance Baily was 7, Mary was 3 and Margaret was 1 -- so Richard apparently arrived late in the year 1624. Hotten, List of Emigrants to America - 1600-1700, pp209-210. -- Worth S. Ray
1620
December 1, 1620
Age 20
Jamestown, James City, Virginia

1611
1611
Age 11

1998
1998
Age 60
Chester, VA, USA
1610
1610
Age 10
Virginia

1622
March 22, 1622
Age 22
Jamestown, Virginia

 

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      134596992.  IV Foulques, Count of Anjou, born 1043; died 1109.  He married 134596993. Bertrade De Montfort.
     
134596993.  Bertrade De Montfort, born 1059; died 1117.

Child of IV Foulques and Bertrade De Montfort is:
           
67298496          i. V Foulques, Count of Anjou, born 1092; died 1143; married Ermengarde Du Maine.

      67298496.  V Foulques, Count of Anjou, born 1092; died 1143.  He was the son of 134596992. IV Foulques, Count of Anjou and 134596993. Bertrade De Montfort.  He married 67298497. Ermengarde Du Maine.
     
67298497.  Ermengarde Du Maine, born 1096; died 1126.

Child of V Foulques and Ermengarde Du Maine is:
    
33649248   i. Earl of Anjou Geoffrey Plantagenet V, born 1113; died 1151; married Empress of Gemany Matilda.

      33649248.  Earl of Anjou Geoffrey Plantagenet V, born 1113; died 1151.  He was the son of 67298496. V Foulques, Count of Anjou and 67298497. Ermengarde Du Maine.  He married 33649249. Empress of Gemany Matilda.
     
33649249.  Empress of Gemany Matilda, born 1102; died 1169.

Child of Geoffrey Plantagenet and Empress Matilda is:

     16824624   i. King of England Henry Plantagenet II, born March 05, 1132/33 in Le Mans, Sarthe, France; died July 06, 1189 in Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, France; married (1) Rosamond De Clifford; married (2) Ykenai Hikenai, Concubine of England; married (3) Princes of Aquitaine Elbeanore May 11, 1152 in Bordeaux, Gironde, France; married (4) Annabel Balliol May 18, 1153.

      33649266.  AlfonsoI, King of PortugaI, born July 1110 in Guimaraes, Portugal; died December 1185 in Coimbra, Portugal.  He married 33649267. Maud of Savoy 1146.
     
33649267.  Maud of Savoy, born in Savoy, France; died December 1157 in Coimbra, Portugal.

Child of Alfonso and Maud Savoy is:
    
16824633   i. Princess of Portugal Urraca, born 1150 in Coimbra, Portugal; died October 1178 in Bamba, Spain; married FernandoII, King of Leon 1165 in Leon, Spain.

      16824624.  King of England Henry Plantagenet II, born March 05, 1132/33 in Le Mans, Sarthe, France; died July 06, 1189 in Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, France.  He was the son of 33649248. Earl of Anjou Geoffrey Plantagenet V and 33649249. Empress of Gemany Matilda.  He married 16824625. Princes of Aquitaine Elbeanore May 11, 1152 in Bordeaux, Gironde, France.
     
16824625.  Princes of Aquitaine Elbeanore, born October 1122 in Bordeaux, France; died March 1203/04 in Poitiers, France.

Children of Henry Plantagenet and Princes Elbeanore are:
                 
i.   William Plantagenet, born 1153; died 1156.
                
ii.   Henry Fitzhenry Plantagenet, Prince of England, born March 28, 1155 in Bermandsey Palace, London, Middlesex, England; died June 11, 1183 in Mortel Castle, Turenne, Correze, France; married Princess of France Marguerite November 02, 1160 in Neubourg, France.
               
iii.   Matilda Plantagenet, Princess of England, born 1156 in London, Middlesex, England; died June 28, 1189 in Brunswick, Germany; married HeinrichV, Duke of Saxony-Bavaria February 01, 1167/68 in St. Peter, Domkirche, Minden, Germany.
                
iv.   King of England Richard Plantagenet I, born September 13, 1157 in Beaumont Palace, Oxfordshire, England; died April 06, 1199 in Chalus, Haute-Vienne, France; married Princess of Navarre Berengaria May 12, 1191 in Limassol. Cyprus.
                 v.   Geoffrey Plantagenet, Prince of England, born September 23, 1158 in England; died August 19, 1186 in Paris, Seine, France.
                
vi.   Philip Plantagenet, Prince of England, born 1160 in England; died 1162 in England.
               
vii.   Eleanor Plantagenet, Princess of England, born October 13, 1162 in Falaise, Calvados, France; died October 31, 1214 in Las Huelgas, Burgos, Spain; married AlfonsoVIII, King of Castile September 1170 in Burgos, Spain; born November 1155 in Soria, Castile, Spain; died October 1214 in Burgos, Spain.
              
viii.   Joanna Plantagenet, Princess of England, born October 1164 in Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France; died September 04, 1199 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; married (1) GuglielmoII, IL of Sicily; married (2) RaimondVI, Count of Toulouse November 1196 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France.
    
8412312 ix. King of England John Plantagenet I, born December 24, 1166 in Kings Manor House, Oxfordshire, England; died October 19, 1216 in Newark, Nottinghamshire, England; married (1) Agatha De Ferrers; married (2) Hawise De Warrene; married (3) Matilda Gifford; married (4) Miss Plantagenet; married (5) Isabella Fitzrobert August 29, 1189 in Marlborough, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; married (6) Isabella De Taillefer August 24, 1200 in Bordeaux, Gironde, France.

      16824632.  FernandoII, King of Leon, born 1137; died January 1186/87 in Benevente, Italy.  He married 16824633. Princess of Portugal Urraca 1165 in Leon, Spain.
     
16824633.  Princess of Portugal Urraca, born 1150 in Coimbra, Portugal; died October 1178 in Bamba, Spain.  She was the daughter of 33649266. AlfonsoI, King of PortugaI and 33649267. Maud of Savoy.

Child of Fernando and Princess Urraca is:
    
8412316 i.   Alfonso IX, the Slobberer, King of Leon, born August 1171 in Zamora, Spain; died September 1230 in Seville, Spain; married Heiress of Castile Berengaria December 1197 in Valladolid, Spain.

      16824634.  AlfonsoVIII, King of Castile, born November 1155 in Soria, Castile, Spain; died October 1214 in Burgos, Spain.  He married 16824635. Eleanor Plantagenet, Princess of England September 1170 in Burgos, Spain.
     
16824635.  Eleanor Plantagenet, Princess of England, born October 13, 1162 in Falaise, Calvados, France; died October 31, 1214 in Las Huelgas, Burgos, Spain.  She was the daughter of 16824624. King of England Henry Plantagenet II and 16824625. Princes of Aquitaine Elbeanore.

Children of Alfonso and Eleanor Plantagenet are:
    
8412317 i.   Heiress of Castile Berengaria, born 1180 in Burgos, Castile, Spain; died November 1246 in Las Huelgas, Spain; married Alfonso IX, the Slobberer, King of Leon December 1197 in Valladolid, Spain.
                
ii.   Blanche of Castile, Princess of Castile, born March 1186/87 in Valencia, Spain; died November 1252 in Paris, France; married LouisVIII, the Loin, King of France May 1200 in Normandy, France; born September 1187 in Paris, France; died November 1226 in Auvergne, France.

      8412312.  King of England John Plantagenet I, born December 24, 1166 in Kings Manor House, Oxfordshire, England; died October 19, 1216 in Newark, Nottinghamshire, England.  He was the son of 16824624. King of England Henry Plantagenet II and 16824625. Princes of Aquitaine Elbeanore.  He married 8412313. Isabella De Taillefer August 24, 1200 in Bordeaux, Gironde, France.
     
8412313.  Isabella De Taillefer, born 1180; died 1246.

More About King of England John Plantagenet I:

Fact2: Bet. 1199 - 1216, King of England

Children of John Plantagenet and Isabella De Taillefer are:
                 
i.   Richard Plantagenet, Earl Cornwall, Prince of En, born January 05, 1208/09 in Winchester, Hampshire, England; died April 02, 1272 in Berkhamsteadcast, Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England.
                
ii.   Joan Plantagenet, Princess of England, born July 22, 1210 in Coucy, Alsne, France; died March 04, 1237/38 in London, Middlesex, England; married Alexander II Stewart, King of Scotland June 19, 1221 in York, Yorkshire, England.
               
iii.   Isabella Plantagenet, Princess of England, born 1214 in Winchester, Hampshire, England; died December 01, 1241 in Foggia, Apulia, Italy; married FrederickII, Emperor of Roman Empire July 20, 1235 in Worms, Rhinehessen, Hesse-Darmstadt.
                
iv.   Eleanor Plantagenet, Princess of England, born 1215 in Winchester, Hampshire, England; died April 13, 1275 in Montargis, Loiret, France; married (1) William II Marshall, Earl of Pembroke April 23, 1224; married (2) SimonV, De Montfort, Earl of Leicester January 07, 1237/38 in St. Stephen Chapel, Westminster, Middlesex, England.
    
4206156 v.   King of England Henry Plantagenet III, born October 01, 1206 in Winchester, Hampshire, England; died November 16, 1272 in Westminster, Middlesex, England; married Elbeanore Berenger, Countess of Provence January 14, 1235/36 in Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England.

      8412316.  Alfonso IX, the Slobberer, King of Leon, born August 1171 in Zamora, Spain; died September 1230 in Seville, Spain.  He was the son of 16824632. FernandoII, King of Leon and 16824633. Princess of Portugal Urraca.  He married 8412317. Heiress of Castile Berengaria December 1197 in Valladolid, Spain.
     
8412317.  Heiress of Castile Berengaria, born 1180 in Burgos, Castile, Spain; died November 1246 in Las Huelgas, Spain.  She was the daughter of 16824634. AlfonsoVIII, King of Castile and 16824635. Eleanor Plantagenet, Princess of England.

Child of Alfonso IX and Heiress Berengaria is:
    
4206158 i.   FernandoIII, the Saint, King of Castile, born July 1201 in Castile, Spain; died May 1252 in Seville, Spain; married (1) Elizabeth Von Hohenstaufen, of Swabia 1228; married (2) Jeanne De Dammartin 1237 in Burgos, Castile, Spain.

      4206156.  King of England Henry Plantagenet III, born October 01, 1206 in Winchester, Hampshire, England; died November 16, 1272 in Westminster, Middlesex, England.  He was the son of 8412312. King of England John Plantagenet I and 8412313. Isabella De Taillefer.  He married 4206157. Elbeanore Berenger, Countess of Provence January 14, 1235/36 in Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England.
     
4206157.  Elbeanore Berenger, Countess of Provence, born 1217; died 1291.

More About King of England Henry Plantagenet III:

Fact2: Bet. 1216 - 1272, King of England

Children of Henry Plantagenet and Elbeanore Berenger are:
                 
i.   Margaret Plantagenet, Princess of England, born October 05, 1240 in Windsor Castle, Berkshire, England; died February 27, 1274/75 in Cuper Castle, Fifeshire, England.
                
ii.   Beatrice Plantagenet, Princess of England, born June 25, 1242 in Bordeaux, Gascony, France; died March 24, 1274/75 in Bretagne, France; married JeanII, Duke of Bretagne January 22, 1258/59 in St. Denis, Seine, France.
               
iii.   Edmund Plantagenet, Prince of England, born January 16, 1244/45 in London, Middlesex, England; died June 05, 1296 in Bayonne, Pyrennes-Atlanti, France.
                
iv.   Catherine Plantagenet, Princess of England, born November 25, 1253 in Westminster, Middlesex, England; died May 03, 1256 in Westminster, Middlesex, England.
                
v.   Henry Plantagenet, Prince of England, born 1258 in Westminster, Middlesex, England; died 1260 in Westminster, Middlesex, England.
    
2103078 vi.  King of England Edward Plantagenet I, born June 17, 1239 in Westminster, Middlesex, England; died July 07, 1307 in Burgh-on-the-San, Cumberland, England; married Princess of Castile & Leon Eleanor.

      4206158.  FernandoIII, the Saint, King of Castile, born July 1201 in Castile, Spain; died May 1252 in Seville, Spain.  He was the son of 8412316. Alfonso IX, the Slobberer, King of Leon and 8412317. Heiress of Castile Berengaria.  He married 4206159. Elizabeth Von Hohenstaufen, of Swabia 1228.
     
4206159.  Elizabeth Von Hohenstaufen, of Swabia

Children of Fernando and Elizabeth Von Hohenstaufen are:
                 
i. Alfonso X, King of Castile & Leon
    
2103079 ii.  Princess of Castile & Leon Eleanor, born 1244; died 1290; married King of England Edward Plantagenet I.

      2103078.  King of England Edward Plantagenet I, born June 17, 1239 in Westminster, Middlesex, England; died July 07, 1307 in Burgh-on-the-San, Cumberland, England.  He was the son of 4206156. King of England Henry Plantagenet III and 4206157. Elbeanore Berenger, Countess of Provence.  He married 2103079. Princess of Castile & Leon Eleanor.
     
2103079.  Princess of Castile & Leon Eleanor, born 1244; died 1290.  She was the daughter of 4206158. FernandoIII, the Saint, King of Castile and 4206159. Elizabeth Von Hohenstaufen, of Swabia.

More About King of England Edward Plantagenet I:

Fact2: Bet. 1272 - 1307, King of England

Child of Edward Plantagenet and Princess Eleanor is:
    
1051539 i.   Joan Plantagenet, Princess of England, born 1272; died 1307; married The Red Earl Gilbert De Clare.

      1051538.  The Red Earl Gilbert De Clare, born 1243; died 1295.  He married 1051539. Joan Plantagenet, Princess of England.
     
1051539.  Joan Plantagenet, Princess of England, born 1272; died 1307.  She was the daughter of 2103078. King of England Edward Plantagenet I and 2103079. Princess of Castile & Leon Eleanor.

Child of Gilbert De Clare and Joan Plantagenet is:
    
525769  i.   Eleanore De Clare, born 1292; died 1337; married Hugh Despencer.

      525768.  Hugh Despencer, born 1261; died 1326.  He married 525769. Eleanore De Clare.
     
525769.  Eleanore De Clare, born 1292; died 1337.  She was the daughter of 1051538. The Red Earl Gilbert De Clare and 1051539. Joan Plantagenet, Princess of England.

Child of Hugh Despencer and Eleanore De Clare is:
    
262884  i.   Edward Despencer, born 1312; died 1335; married Anne Ferrers.

      262884.  Edward Despencer, born 1312; died 1335.  He was the son of 525768. Hugh Despencer and 525769. Eleanore De Clare.  He married 262885. Anne Ferrers.
     
262885.  Anne Ferrers, died 1367.

Child of Edward Despencer and Anne Ferrers is:
    
131442  i.   Edward Despencer II, born 1336; died 1375; married Elizabeth De Burghersh.

      131442.  Edward Despencer II, born 1336; died 1375.  He was the son of 262884. Edward Despencer and 262885. Anne Ferrers.  He married 131443. Elizabeth De Burghersh.
     
131443.  Elizabeth De Burghersh, born 1342; died 1409.

Child of Edward Despencer and Elizabeth De Burghersh is:
    
65721    i.   Anne Despencer, born 1358; died 1426; married Hugh De Hastings.

      65720.  Hugh De Hastings, born 1362; died 1386.  He married 65721. Anne Despencer.
     
65721.  Anne Despencer, born 1358; died 1426.  She was the daughter of 131442. Edward Despencer II and 131443. Elizabeth De Burghersh.

Child of Hugh De Hastings and Anne Despencer is:
    
32860    i.   Edward Hastings, born 1382; died 1437; married Muriel Dinham. 

      32860.  Edward Hastings, born 1382; died 1437.  He was the son of 65720. Hugh De Hastings and 65721. Anne Despencer.  He married 32861. Muriel Dinham.
     
32861.  Muriel Dinham

Child of Edward Hastings and Muriel Dinham is:
    
16430    i.   John Hastings, born 1411; died 1477; married Anne Morley.

      16400.  John Lacy, born 1375.  He married 16401. Ann Alice Eland.
     
16401.  Ann Alice Eland

Child of John Lacy and Ann Eland is:
    
8200      i.   Gilbert Lacy, born 1400; married Johanna Soothill.

      16402.  Gerald Soothill, born 1375.

Child of Gerald Soothill is:
    
8201      i.   Johanna Soothill, born 1400; married Gilbert Lacy.

      16430.  John Hastings, born 1411; died 1477.  He was the son of 32860. Edward Hastings and 32861. Muriel Dinham.  He married 16431. Anne Morley.
     
16431.  Anne Morley, born 1413; died 1471.

Child of John Hastings and Anne Morley is:
    
8215      i.   Elizabeth Hastings, born 1437; married Robert Hildyard.

      8200.  Gilbert Lacy, born 1400.  He was the son of 16400. John Lacy and 16401. Ann Alice Eland.  He married 8201. Johanna Soothill.
     
8201.  Johanna Soothill, born 1400.  She was the daughter of 16402. Gerald Soothill.

Child of Gilbert Lacy and Johanna Soothill is:
    
4100      i.   Gerald Lacy, born 1425; married Joan Symmes.

      8214.  Robert Hildyard  He married 8215. Elizabeth Hastings.
     
8215.  Elizabeth Hastings, born 1437.  She was the daughter of 16430. John Hastings and 16431. Anne Morley.

Child of Robert Hildyard and Elizabeth Hastings is:
    
4107      i.   Kathryn Hildyard, married William Girlington.

      4096.  Henry Ferror, born in Ewood, Halifax, Yorkshire, England.

Child of Henry Ferror is:
    
2048      i.   Henry Ferror, born 1494 in Ewewood, Halifax Parish, Yorkshire, England; died November 06, 1549 in Yorkshire, England; married Agnes Horsfall 1513 in Halifax Parish, Yorkshire, England.

      4100.  Gerald Lacy, born 1425.  He was the son of 8200. Gilbert Lacy and 8201. Johanna Soothill.  He married 4101. Joan Symmes.
      4101.  Joan Symmes

Child of Gerald Lacy and Joan Symmes is:
    
2050      i.   John Hugh Lacy, born 1475 in Brearley, England; died 1573 in England; married Agnes Savile.

      4102.  Esq. Nicholas Savile  He married 4103. Margery Wilkinson.
     
4103.  Margery Wilkinson

Child of Nicholas Savile and Margery Wilkinson is:
    
2051      i.   Agnes Savile, married John Hugh Lacy.

      4104.  Roger Kelke, born in Barnetby-le-Wold, Lincolnshire, England.  He married 4105. Elizabeth De La See.
     
4105.  Elizabeth De La See

Child of Roger Kelke and Elizabeth De La See is:
    
2052      i.   Christopher Kelke, born 1491; died 1524; married Isabel Girlington.

      4106.  William Girlington  He married 4107. Kathryn Hildyard.
     
4107.  Kathryn Hildyard  She was the daughter of 8214. Robert Hildyard and 8215. Elizabeth Hastings.

Child of William Girlington and Kathryn Hildyard is:
    
2053      i.   Isabel Girlington, born 1495; married Christopher Kelke.

      4122.  Richard Pierce  He married 4123. Elizabeth.
     
4123.  Elizabeth

Child of Richard Pierce and Elizabeth is:
    
2061      i.   Alice Pierce, born 1530 in Dorset, England; married Joseph Fitzpen.

      4160.  Pensham Baugh, born 1512.

Children of Pensham Baugh are:
    
2080      i.   Edward Baugh, born 1535; died 1571; married Margaret Stratford.
                   
ii.   Robert Baugh, born 1537.

      2048.  Henry Ferror, born 1494 in Ewewood, Halifax Parish, Yorkshire, England; died November 06, 1549 in Yorkshire, England.  He was the son of 4096. Henry Ferror.  He married 2049. Agnes Horsfall 1513 in Halifax Parish, Yorkshire, England.
     
2049.  Agnes Horsfall, born 1480 in Stothlay, England; died in England.

More About Henry Ferror:

Burial: Heptonstall, Tormoden, Yorkshire, England

Children of Henry Ferror and Agnes Horsfall are:
                 
i.   Hugh Farrar
                
ii.   Edward Farrar, born 1518.
               
iii.   Henry Farrar, born 1520 in Holinbey, England; died April 15, 1586.
    
1024    iv.   William Ferror, born 1522 in Ewood, Halifax, Yorkshire, England; died 1571; married Margaret Lacy.
                
v.   John Farrar, born 1524.
                
vi.   Agnes Farrar, born 1526.
               
vii.   Nicholas Ferror, born 1545 in Yorkshire, England; died 1620; married Mary Woodnoth 1580.

      2050.  John Hugh Lacy, born 1475 in Brearley, England; died 1573 in England.  He was the son of 4100. Gerald Lacy and 4101. Joan Symmes.  He married 2051. Agnes Savile.
     
2051.  Agnes Savile  She was the daughter of 4102. Esq. Nicholas Savile and 4103. Margery Wilkinson.

Child of John Lacy and Agnes Savile is:
    
1025      i.   Margaret Lacy, born 1530 in England; married William Ferror.

      2052.  Christopher Kelke, born 1491; died 1524.  He was the son of 4104. Roger Kelke and 4105. Elizabeth De La See.  He married 2053. Isabel Girlington.
     
2053.  Isabel Girlington, born 1495.  She was the daughter of 4106. William Girlington and 4107. Kathryn Hildyard.

Child of Christopher Kelke and Isabel Girlington is:
    
1026      i.   William Kelke, born 1530 in Barnetby-le-Wold, Lincolnshire, England; died 1552 in Barnetby-le-Wold, Lincolnshire, England; married Thomasine Skerme.

      2054.  Percival Skerme

Child of Percival Skerme is:
    
1027      i.   Thomasine Skerme, married William Kelke.

      2060.  Joseph Fitzpen  He married 2061. Alice Pierce.
     
2061.  Alice Pierce, born 1530 in Dorset, England.  She was the daughter of 4122. Richard Pierce and 4123. Elizabeth.

Child of Joseph Fitzpen and Alice Pierce is:
    
1030      i.   Robert Fitzpen, born 1552 in Dorset, England; married Cicilie Jordan September 18, 1580.

      2062.  Thomas Jordan, born in Dorset, England.

Child of Thomas Jordan is:
    
1031      i.   Cicilie Jordan, born in Dorset, England; married Robert Fitzpen September 18, 1580.

      2080.  Edward Baugh, born 1535; died 1571.  He was the son of 4160. Pensham Baugh.  He married 2081. Margaret Stratford.
     
2081.  Margaret Stratford, born 1535; died 1589.

Children of Edward Baugh and Margaret Stratford are:
    
1040      i.   Roland Baugh, born 1557 in England; married Mary Cooker.
                
ii.   Thomas Baugh, born 1559.
               
iii.   Robert Baugh, born 1561; died 1589.
                
iv.   William Baugh, born 1563.
                
v.   Anne Baugh, born 1567.

      1024.  William Ferror, born 1522 in Ewood, Halifax, Yorkshire, England; died 1571.  He was the son of 2048. Henry Ferror and 2049. Agnes Horsfall.  He married 1025. Margaret Lacy.
     
1025.  Margaret Lacy, born 1530 in England.  She was the daughter of 2050. John Hugh Lacy and 2051. Agnes Savile.

More About William Ferror:

Burial: Parish Church, Heptonstall, York, England

Occupation: Yeoman

Children of William Ferror and Margaret Lacy are:
                 
i.   Hugh Farrar
                
ii.   Ellen Farrar
               
iii.   Mary Farrar, married Richard Wade.
                
iv.   Margaret Farrar, married Edward Wilkenson.
               
v.   Agnes Farrar
                 vi.   Henry Farrar, born 1544; died 1610 in London, England; married Ellen Blakey; died 1623.
    
512     vii.   John Farrar, born December 02, 1550 in Ewood, Halifax, England; died November 11, 1627 in Ewood, Halifax, England; married Cecily Kelke August 26, 1574 in England.

      1026.  William Kelke, born 1530 in Barnetby-le-Wold, Lincolnshire, England; died 1552 in Barnetby-le-Wold, Lincolnshire, England.  He was the son of 2052. Christopher Kelke and 2053. Isabel Girlington.  He married 1027. Thomasine Skerme.
     
1027.  Thomasine Skerme  She was the daughter of 2054. Percival Skerme.

Child of William Kelke and Thomasine Skerme is:
    
513       i.   Cecily Kelke, born 1552 in England; married John Farrar August 26, 1574 in England.

      1028.  Thomas Reynolds

Child of Thomas Reynolds is:
    
514       i.   Thomas Reynolds II, married Cicely Pippen.

      1030.  Robert Fitzpen, born 1552 in Dorset, England.  He was the son of 2060. Joseph Fitzpen and 2061. Alice Pierce.  He married 1031. Cicilie Jordan September 18, 1580.
     
1031.  Cicilie Jordan, born in Dorset, England.  She was the daughter of 2062. Thomas Jordan.

Children of Robert Fitzpen and Cicilie Jordan are:
                 
i.   Owen Fitzpen, born 1582.
    
515       ii.   Cicely Pippen, born 1593 in Dorset, England; married Thomas Reynolds II.

      1040.  Roland Baugh, born 1557 in England.  He was the son of 2080. Edward Baugh and 2081. Margaret Stratford.  He married 1041. Mary Cooker.
     
1041.  Mary Cooker, born 1557.

Children of Roland Baugh and Mary Cooker are:
                 
i.   Edward Baugh, born 1575.
                
ii.   Margaret Baugh, born 1577.
               
iii.   Mary Baugh, born 1579.
                
iv.   Alice Baugh, born 1581.
                
v.   Rowland Baugh, born 1583.
    
520      vi.   William Baugh, born 1584 in England; died 1687; married Mary Wakeman.
               
vii.   John Baugh, born 1586.
              
viii.   Stephen Baugh, born 1588.
               
ix.   Richard Baugh, born 1590.
                
x.   Thomas Baugh, born 1592.

        512.  John Farrar, born December 02, 1550 in Ewood, Halifax, England; died November 11, 1627 in Ewood, Halifax, England.  He was the son of 1024. William Ferror and 1025. Margaret Lacy.  He married 513. Cecily Kelke August 26, 1574 in England.
       
513.  Cecily Kelke, born 1552 in England.  She was the daughter of 1026. William Kelke and 1027. Thomasine Skerme.

Children of John Farrar and Cecily Kelke are:
                 
i.   John Farrar, married Susan Hanson.
                
ii.   Humpfrey Farrar
               
iii.   Henry Farrar, born 1575; died 1645; married Martha Woodward.
    
256      iv.   Commissioner William Farrar, born April 25, 1583 in Ewewood, Halifax Parish, England; died June 11, 1637 in Jamestown, VA; married Cicely Reynolds May 02, 1625 in Jamestown, VA.

      514.  Thomas Reynolds II  He was the son of 1028. Thomas Reynolds.  He married 515. Cicely Pippen.
     
515.  Cicely Pippen, born 1593 in Dorset, England.  She was the daughter of 1030. Robert Fitzpen and 1031. Cicilie Jordan.

Child of Thomas Reynolds and Cicely Pippen is:
    
257       i.   Cicely Reynolds, born 1601 in Dorset, England; died 1677 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; married (1) Bailey 1618; married (2) Samuel Jordan 1621; married (3) Commissioner William Farrar May 02, 1625 in Jamestown, VA; married (4) Peter Montague 1638; married (5) Thomas Parker 1666.

      520.  William Baugh, born 1584 in England; died 1687.  He was the son of 1040. Roland Baugh and 1041. Mary Cooker.  He married 521. Mary Wakeman.
     
521.  Mary Wakeman, born 1584.

Children of William Baugh and Mary Wakeman are:
                 
i.   Edward Baugh, born 1600.
    
260      ii.   William Baugh, Sr., born 1602 in Henrico Co., VA; died August 1678; married Virginia Elizabeth Parkerals Sharpe.
                
iii.   John Baugh, born 1604.
                
iv.   Anne Baugh, born 1606.

      256.  Commissioner William Farrar, born April 25, 1583 in Ewewood, Halifax Parish, England; died June 11, 1637 in Jamestown, VA.  He was the son of 512. John Farrar and 513. Cecily Kelke.  He married 257. Cicely Reynolds May 02, 1625 in Jamestown, VA.
     
257.  Cicely Reynolds, born 1601 in Dorset, England; died 1677 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA.  She was the daughter of 514. Thomas Reynolds II and 515. Cicely Pippen.

More About Commissioner William Farrar:

Emigration: August 1618, Aboard the ship "Neptune" /Virginia

More About Cicely Reynolds:

Emigration: August 1611, Arrived aboard the ship "Swan" /Jamestown, VA

Children of William Farrar and Cicely Reynolds are:
    
128       i.   Col. William Farrar II, born 1626 in Jamestown, VA; died February 11, 1677/78 in Henrico Co., VA; married Mary Williams 1656.
                
ii.   Cicely Farrar, born 1627 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died 1703; married Henry Sherman, Sr.
               
iii.   Lt. Col. John Farrar, born 1631 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died March 1684/85 in Henrico Co., VA.

More About Lt. Col. John Farrar:

Military service: Lt. Col. of the Militia

Occupation: Justice and High Sheriff

      258.  John Williams, born 1604 in VA.  He married 259. Mary Womack.
     
259.  Mary Womack

Child of John Williams and Mary Womack is:     129       i.   Mary Williams, died 1677 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; married Col. William Farrar II 1656.

      260.  William Baugh, Sr., born 1602 in Henrico Co., VA; died August 1678.  He was the son of 520. William Baugh and 521. Mary Wakeman.  He married 261. Virginia Elizabeth Parkerals Sharpe.
     
261.  Virginia Elizabeth Parkerals Sharpe, born 1602; died 1710.

Children of William Baugh and Virginia Sharpe are:
                 
i.   Thomas Baugh, born 1620.
                
ii.   Priscilla Baugh, born 1622.
               
iii.   John Baugh, born 1632; died 1726 in Henrico Co., VA; married Margaret; born 1632.
                
iv.   Mary Baugh, born 1634; married Thomas Howlett; born 1640.
    
130       v.   William Baugh, Jr., born 1635; died 1687; married Jane Hatcher.
                
vi.   Katherine Baugh, born 1636; married Jones; born 1640.
               
vii.   James Baugh, born 1639; died 1722; married Elizabeth Ashbrook.

      262.  William Hatcher, born 1614 in Carey, England.  He married 263. Marian Newporte.
     
263.  Marian Newporte

Child of William Hatcher and Marian Newporte is:
    
131       i.   Jane Hatcher, born 1640; died January 1709/10; married (1) William Baugh, Jr.; married (2) William Branch; married (3) Abell Gower.

      128.  Col. William Farrar II, born 1626 in Jamestown, VA; died February 11, 1677/78 in Henrico Co., VA.  He was the son of 256. Commissioner William Farrar and 257. Cicely Reynolds.  He married 129. Mary Williams 1656.
     
129.  Mary Williams, died 1677 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA.  She was the daughter of 258. John Williams and 259. Mary Womack.

More About Col. William Farrar II:

Military service: Commander of a militia company

Children of William Farrar and Mary Williams are:
                 
i.   Cicely Farrar
    
64        ii.   Major William Farrar III, born 1657 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died 1721 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; married (1) Priscilla Baugh 1682 in Henrico Co., VA; married (2) Mary Tanner 1707.
               
iii.   Martha Farrar, born 1663 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; married Walter Shipley.
                
iv.   Thomas Farrar, born 1665 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died 1742 in Goochland Co., VA; married (1) Mary Harris Ligon 1682 in Henrico Co., VA; born 1663; married (2) Katherine Perrin October 01, 1686 in Goochland Co., VA; born 1670 in New Kent Co., VA; died May 1747 in Goochland Co., Va.
                
v.   John Farrar, born 1670 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died 1729 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; married Temperance Brown November 16, 1691 in Henrico Co., VA; born in Charles City, Henrico Co., VA; died 1721.

      130.  William Baugh, Jr., born 1635; died 1687.  He was the son of 260. William Baugh, Sr. and 261. Virginia Elizabeth Parkerals Sharpe.  He married 131. Jane Hatcher.
     
131.  Jane Hatcher, born 1640; died January 1709/10.  She was the daughter of 262. William Hatcher and 263. Marian Newporte.

Children of William Baugh and Jane Hatcher are:
    
65         i.   Priscilla Baugh, born 1669 in Henrico Co., VA; died 1706 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; married Major William Farrar III 1682 in Henrico Co., VA.
                
ii.   Mary Baugh, born 1670; married John Howlett; born 1665.
               
iii.   John Baugh, born 1672.
                
iv.   Katherine Baugh, born 1675; married Jones; born 1661.
                
v.   James Baugh, born 1677; married Agnes; born 1673.
                
vi.   Thomas Baugh, born 1679.

      64.  Major William Farrar III, born 1657 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died 1721 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA.  He was the son of 128. Col. William Farrar II and 129. Mary Williams.  He married 65. Priscilla Baugh 1682 in Henrico Co., VA.
     
65.  Priscilla Baugh, born 1669 in Henrico Co., VA; died 1706 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA.  She was the daughter of 130. William Baugh, Jr. and 131. Jane Hatcher.

 

About Temperance Cocke (Bailey)

Temperance Bailey was born 1617, and died 1651.

Parents: Thomas Bailey/Bayley and Cecily Reynolds.

Married:

  1. John Browne d. abt 1632
  2. in 1637 in Baileys Point, Henrico Co., Virginia to Richard Cocke, son of John Cocke and Elizabeth??, as his first wife. He married Mary Aston as second wife. Richard Cocke was 05 Sep 1602, Stottesdon, Shropshire, England and d. 04 Oct 1665, "Bremo", Henrico Co., Virginia

Children of Temperance Bailey and John Browne:

  1. It is not clear whether Temperance and John Browne had children. There is one possible son, a John Brown, who died before 1677.

Children of Temperance Bailey and Richard Cocke:

  1. Thomas Coxe b. 1639; d. April 01, 1697; m. (1) MARGARET OR AGNES POWELL8, Bef. 1662, Henrico Co., Va.; b. Abt. 1645, Henrico Co., Virginia; m. (2) MARGARET WOOD, Abt. 1663; b. Abt. 1640, Virginia; d. Abt. 1719, Virginia.
  2. Richard Coxe (the Elder) b. December 10, 1639, Bremo, Curles, Henrico County, VA; d. November 20, 1706, Bremo, Fluvanna County, VA.

Notes

Cecily married Thomas Bailey (at the Pierce home). Thomas was a governers guard, and they had a child Temperance (our Temperance) Bailey, she was born in 1617. She was named for the Governers wife George Yardley had a wife named Temperance West". Thomas contracted malaria and died in 1619. He was a landowner recieving 200 which he called Bailey's Point. Temperance inherited this 20 Sept. 1620. Upon Temperances death 10 Oct. 1652 land went to Richard Cocke

From "Early Virginia Ancestors of Our Cox-Cocke Family and Their Colonial Cousins":

Temperance Bailey was born about 1617. She was probably the daughter of Sisley or Ciceley (Reynolds) Jordan by a first husband named Bailey. After King James of Scotland mounted the English Throne, he gave his approval for colonizing the New World and granted charters to the newly organized London Company. 200 acres of land was given to each subscriber, his heirs forever, who would pay twelve pounds and twelve shillings for shares in this Company. Several members of the Bailey Family held large shares and the fact that Temperance Bailey, at age three, had 200 acres of land in her name may suggest that this was her inheritance from her deceased father. Patent to Temperance Bailey, September 20, 1620. The land of John Rolfe and Pocahontas on the south side of the James River bordered that of Samuel Jordan, Temperance Bailey and Captain Woodlief in 1620. At age 6, Temperance Bailey was living at Jourdan's Journey, Charles City County in 1623 and was listed in the muster of William Farrar and Mistress Sisley Jordan.

About 1632 according to minutes of the Colonial Council, Richard Cocke married the widow of John Browne and was appointed trustee and guardian of the Browne children. On October 10, 1652, a land patent re-issued to Richard Cocke included 100 acres of land due by patent to Temperance Bailey, September 20, 1620. It would seem that Richard Cocke inherited 100 acres due Temperance Bailey because she was his wife, widow of John Browne, deceased.

    

Notes for THOMAS COCKE: Thomas was the eldest son of Richard, succeeded to his fathers estate and lived at Bremo. He was one of the members of the Henrico Co. court in 1680 and High Sheriff from that year to 1688.

The original seats of the family were "Bremor" or "Bremo", and Malvern Hills, both belonging to the same estate, and located on the James River, about fifteen miles below Richmond. The manor house, which was probably built by Richard Cocke, and which was occupied by his descendents for nearly two hundred years, is still standing.

Links

Sources

  • [S8] Adventurers of Purse and Person - Virginia - 1607-1624/5, Fourth Edition, Volume One, Families A-F, John Frederick Dorman, (Name: Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Md., 2004;).
  • [S207] Descendants of Thomas & Cicily Reynolds Baley/Bailey including Abraham & Peter Cocke Bailey of Jamestown, VA 1600's, Donna Beers, (Name: Warrensburg, MO: 1998;).

 

About Samuel Jordan, of Jordan's Journey

Samuel Jordan, born in England, arrived in America in 1610 after a 14-month journey. The ship had been wrecked on an island in the Bermudas where nine months of hard labor were spent building a new vessel before sailing on to Jamestown. As one of the most educated men on the company, Jordan was selected to keep a journal of the proceedings, published in London under the title A Discovery of Bermudas. The new governor, Lord De La Ware, and John Rolfe arrived in Virginia on the same ship. This reinforcement of men and supplies saved the Jamestown settlement whose survivors were about to return to England.

      In Virginia, Samuel was granted 450 acres of land in his own right and 250 acres more for transporting his five servants. His estate was known as Jordan's Journey and was located on the James River, just south of the mouth of the Appomattox. He was a Member of the first Assembly at Jamestown in 1619 and was listed as a gentleman planter at Charles City. He was also a member of the committee to review the first four books into which the Great Charter of Virginia was divided. He fortified his house, Beggar's Bush, during an Indian ambush of 1622, and lived in despight of the enemy. The governor, Francis Wyatt wrote to the Council in London, in April of 1622, that he thoughtit fitt to hold a few outlying places including theJamestown. Samuel, a widower with three sons (Samuel, Robert and Thomas) still in England, married Cecily (Bailey?) who had arrived in Virginia on the Swann in 1611. They had three daughters before he died in 1623. 

___________________________________________________

Silas Samuel Jordan, also known as Sylvester Jourdain, was born probably in Dorsetshire, England ca. 1578 and died in 1623 at the plantation he built on the James River near the Jamestown Colony of Virginia called Jordan's Journey. [1] [13] [16]

Sylverter Jourdain was a separate person, perhaps a cousin. He returned to England.

Parents: William Jourdain and ? / Robert Jordan and ?? [2] [3]

Married:

  1. at around age 18 and bef. 1596 in England to Frances ?? She died before 1609. [4] [5]
  2. about 1619 to Cicely Reynolds Bayley (ca. 1602-1662), widow of Thomas Bayley (or Bailey). [6] [7] Cecily was pregnant with Margaret when Samuel died; she married William Ferrar following a flirtation with the minister of the parish, Greville Pooley, that was taken notice of by the council in a solemn proclamation. [8]

Children of Samuel Jordan and ??, all born England, and all followed their father to the New World:

  1. Anne Marie (Jordan) Hulet, born England 1596, married Laurence Hulet.
  2. Robert Jordan, born England 1598, immigrated 1619 (as a Bridewell immigrant), died 22 Mar 1622 in the Great Indian Massacre of 1622.
  3. Thomas Jordan, born England 1600, immigrated to the Virginia Colony aboard the Diana in 1620, married Lucy (Corker) Jordan (born 1605), and died 1644.
  4. Samuel Jordan, born England 1608.

Children of Samuel Jordan and Cecily Bailey, born in Jordans Journey, Virginia:

  1. Mary Jordan, born 1621 or 1622.
  2. Margaret Jordan, born Jordans Journey 1623, after her father's death

Biography

Samuel Jordan at age 31, was a member of the Virginia Company of London. He embarked on the journey to the New World under the "Second Charter" on the "Seaventure" commanded by Captain Christopher Newport, who was previously commander of the Susan Constant in 1607, the John & Francis in 1607-1608, and the Mary & Margaret in 1608. True to its name those aboard the Seaventure set sail for a truly memorable Sea Adventure.

The new governor, Lord De La Ware and John Rolfe were also on the ship. They were ship wrecked on an island in the Bermudas and spent nine months of hard labor building a new vessel before sailing on to Jamestown. Jordan, one of the most educated on the ship, was chosen to keep a journal of the proceedings, published in London under the title A Disscovery of Bermudas. [9]

According to tradition, the voyage of the Sea Venture to the New World became the basis for William Shakespeare's play "The Tempest" which was based on the account written by passenger Sir William Strachey: A True Repertory of the Wreck and Redemption of Sir Thomas Gates, Knight, 1610.

The Jamestown settlers were about to return to England when Jordan's ship brought a reinforcement of men and supplies and saved the Jamestown settlement. Samuel was granted 450 acres of land in his own right and 250 acres more for transporting his five servants.

He first settled at "Jordans Journey" near the confluence of the Appomattox and James Rivers - on the James just south of the mouth of the Appomattox. Samuel Jordon later added large holdings on the south bank of the James at Jordon's Point, where he built a house called "Beggars Bush." The neighbor to the north of the Jordans was Captain John Woodlief who had already held the first American Thanksgiving in 1619 at Berkeley Plantation. John Rolfe (II) their neighbor to the south, had won and lost Pocahontas. [10]

He was a Member of the first Assembly at Jamestown in 1619 and was listed as a gentleman planter at Charles City. The land patent officially signed in 1619 by Colonial Governor Sir George Yardley named him "Ancient Planter", [11] a title granted in recognition of only those very few early settlers who survived a decade. The grant also referred to Captain Jordan as "Gentleman" in honor of his position as a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses, the first legislative body in the New World.

He was a member of the committee to review the first four books into which the Great Charter of Virginia was divided and represented Charles City at the first representative legislative assembly in the New World which convened at Jamestown, 30 July 1619. A marker at Jamestown, Virginia, lists the names of the Burgesses who represented the different areas of the Jamestown Colony; he represented Charles City.

The Powhattan Indians tried to destroy the entire English Colony on Good Friday, 1622. Fortunately for the Jordons, they received a forewarning in time to protect "Beggar's Bush" against attack and save their buildings and most of the livestock. [12] Jordan's Journey was a stronghold of the colony to which settlers fled for safety when attacked by Indians. [13]

After the Massacre, "Master Samuel Jordan gathered together but a few of the stragglers about him at 'Beggar's Bush' where he fortified himself and lived in despight of the enemy." Governor Wyatt wrote to the Virginia Company, April 1622, "that he thought fit to hold a few outlying places, including the plantation of Mr. Samuel Jordan; but to abandon others and concentrate the colonists at Jamestown." [15]

Samuel Jordan is known to have died prior to the February 16, 1623 census of Virginia colonists because his name is conspicuously missing from the list of inhabitants at Jordan's Journey. [14] It is not known where he is buried. A team of archaeologists began excavating Jordan’s Journey in 1990 and finished in 1992. Hinges that may have been from a document box were found in one grave containing a male 35 to 39 years old and its theorized that this might have been the grave of Samuel Jordan. [16]

  • [1] Before telling the Jordan story, we should say something about the pronunciation of the surname. Jordan in many cases was and is spoken as to rhyme with burden. Reports tell of many Jordan families in Virginia and elsewhere today who use this traditional pronunciation: Jurden. And they are among the descendants of Samuel Jordan. (Woodrough)
  • [2] The Jordans were related to Phippin family in Dorsetshire, and Samuel is said to have been Cecily Phippin's first cousin, one generation removed. (Woodrough)
  • [3] According to one account, as related in the book THESE JORDANS WERE HERE by Octavia Jordan Perry, the Jordans originally bore the name Deandon. The first of the Deandons came to England with William the Conqueror in 1066 and settled in Devon. Later a William Deandon went to Palestine with the Crusaders around 1200, and upon his return to England he was knighted as Sir William de Jordan. During the reign of James I, part of the large family of Ignatius Jordan, a descendent of Sir William, migrated to the New World. Other Jordans went to Ireland, and some remained in England. (Doyle)
  • Historical records tell us the following: Silvester Jourdain (Jourdan) was a son of William Jourdain (Jourdan) of Lume Regis, Dorsetshire, brother of Ignatius, and cousin of John. Silvester accompanied Sir George Summers and Sir Thomas Gates, deputy governors of Virginia, on their trip to that colony in 1609-1610, and he experienced shipwreck on Bermuda (Samuel Jordan was on the same ship and the two are sometimes confused by researchers). On his return to England, Silvester wrote "A Discovery of the Barmudas, otherwise called the Ile of Divils". It is believed that Shakespeare used this and other shipwreck survivor accounts as background for "The Tempest". (Doyle)
  • [4] His first wife may have been either of English or French descent. (Jordan's Journey)
  • [5] Samuel Jordan was in Virginia about a decade before any of his children. Reports show that he was a widower when he arrived in Jamestown. There is no clue as to how the children were cared for during his absence in the New World. (Woodrough)
  • [6] Legend says that she was spoken of as a "a notorious flirt" and "the Glamour Girl" in the colony. (Jordan's Journey)
  • [7] After being a widower 10 to 15 years, Samuel married Cecily Phippin Reynolds Baley about 10 years after he arrived in Jamestown. Most Jordan researchers have reported that Cecily was a lot younger than Samuel. Just how younger is a big question. Most sources say Cecily was beautiful, enchanting and mysterious. There are no descriptions of Samuel Jordan, but he no doubt had a command presence and would be attractive for that reason if none other. ... By all accounts, Cecily was an enchanting enigma – quite a beauty and exhibiting tenderness, toughness and mystery. She was highly favored by men and befriended by women. She was reported, for example, to have been good friends with Temperance West Lady Yardley, wife of Sir George Yardley, who was then governor. (Woodrough)
  • [8] After Jordan’s death in March 1623, a year after the Powhatan assault, his plantation manager William Farrar, Cecily Jordan’s husband-to-be, was issued a warrant to bring in the account of the Jordan estate. A separate warrant was issued to Cecily Jordan, ordering that Farrar put in security for the performance of her husband’s will. We could not locate a copy of the will. (Woodrough)
  • Cecily always seemed to be up to something, or the people around her were up to something. Samuel Jordan’s body was hardly in the ground before suitors started competing for her attention. Among the suitors was the man who preached Samuel’s funeral, the very amorous Grivell Pooley.
  • From all accounts, Preacher Pooley worked himself into a frenzy over Cecily, and although she did not discourage his efforts she eventually spurned him, and that hurt. We have no reports on the quality of his preaching during this period, but we all can imagine. Actually, Cecily didn’t exactly spurn the parson. She revealed to him that she was pregnant and did not want to marry for that reason, and also because Samuel had been dead only three days.
  • Directly, Cecily became engaged to Captain William Farrar, manager of Jordan’s Journey and member of the Virginia Council, but Preacher Pooley was not the sort to go softly into the night. He filed a formal complaint in the House of Burgesses. In testimony in connection with his legal challenge, Preacher Pooley claimed that he had betrothed Cecily to himself three days after he preached Samuel Jordan’s funeral.
  • Witnesses testified that the idea of marriage seemed to be the preacher’s, not Cecily’s. She was reported as saying that the preacher was about as good as any other man around but noted that she was not interested in marriage at the time. But the preacher was on a roll by now and proceeded to recite her marriage vows for her, kiss her, and share a glass of wine with her. Witnesses testified that she had not said “I do” at any point during the parson’s performance.
  • The dispute became perhaps the most controversial case to reach the House of Burgesses, and the burgesses promptly dropped it like a hot potato and sent it to London where the case eventually was decided in Cecily’s favor. The House of Burgesses, meanwhile, passed a law forbidding any woman in the future from promising to marry more than one man. It is not clear what that meant, although we probably know what the burgesses intended.
  • Anyway, Cecily went ahead with her marriage to William Farrar, but the strangeness of all this does not end here. Cecily then revealed to listeners a vision she had one night at Jordan’s Journey. She said she saw two hands, one pointing at her and one pointing at her youngest daughter, while she heard a voice repeat the word judgment several times. Certain colonists more attuned to spiritual matters told her that she must have been dreaming, but she insisted that she was wide awake when she had the vision. No one came forward with a suggestion as to what it all meant.
  • [9] His log survived to become a valuable part of the early history of voyages to the New World. Reportedly the description he provided of the terrible Bermuda storm suggested to Shakespeare the setting for his play "The Tempest". An excerpt follows:

I being in ship called "Seaventure" ... we were taken with a most sharpe and cruell storme, which did not only separate vs from the residue of our fleete but with the violent working of the sea, our ship became so shaken, torne, and leaked, that shee received so much water, as covered two tir of hogsheads above the ballast, that our men stood vp to the middles, with buckets, horicos and kettles to baile out the water, and continually pumped for three days and three nights together, without any intermission ... (Jordan's Journey)

  • [10] Jordan named his plantation Diggs His Hundred, which is an oddity excelling all other oddities in colonial history. The name gives us a hint that Samuel Jordan had a sense of humor. The second hint may be more than a hint. After building his home in what would later become Charles City, he named the home Beggar’s Bush. (Woodbrough)
  • Beggar’s bush may have been a common expression in 17th Century England, a reference to vagabonds and where they spent the night. Vagabonds were wandering ne’er-do-wells and often beggars, and their realm was bush. Think of bush as being an outback to get a clearer meaning. Jordan perhaps was humorously calling himself a vagabond reduced to begging and living on uncleared land – the bush. Despite the gloom around him, it seems, Jordan chose to live on the brighter side as he developed his plantation. (Woodbrough)
  • [11] The title ancient planter seems rather odd to the modern ear, but it no doubt carried a different connotation in the 17th Century. Check the dictionary and find that ancient and venerable are synonyms. Then look up planter and find that its second definition is settler. Therefore, ancient planter in those days could mean the same as venerable settler does today. (Woodrough}
  • [12] Robert Jordan, Samuel's son with Frances, was killed during the Powhatan Massacre of 1622 at Berkeley Town and Hundred, which was on the north side of the James River across from Jordan’s Journey. (Woodrough)
  • [13] Baby Mary Jordan probably had no memory of that fateful day of the vernal equinox, 22 March 1622, when the Great Indian Massacre fell on the colony like a thunderbolt from the sky.
  • Early that morning Richard Pace had rowed with might and main three miles across the river from Paces Paines to Beggar's Bush to warn Samuel Jordan of the impending blow. Without losing an instant, Samuel Jordan summoned his neighbours from far and near and gathered them all, men, women and children, within his fortified home at Beggar's Bush. So resolutely was the place defended, that not a single life was lost there on that bloody day. The agony and terror of the women and children huddled together in the farthest corner of the little stronghold can only be imagined.
  • The next day Mr. William Farrar reached Beggar's Bush a few miles journey from his plantation on the Appomattox River. Ten victims had been slaughtered at his home and he himself had barely escaped to safety at the Jordan's where circumstances would force him to remain for some time.
  • About one third of Virginia colonists died in the Indian Massacre including Samuel's son Robert Jordan at Berkley Hundred in Charles City while trying to warn neighbors across the water of the impending Indian attack. In those days most people got around by boat and freely went from one side of the river to the other. The Berkleys were also killed. (Mayes)
  • [14] Believing the English intended to seize his domains, his [Opechancanough, brother of Powhatan, "King of Pamunkey "] patriotism impelled him to strike a blow. In an affray with a settler, an Indian leader was shot, and the wily emperor made it the occasion for inflaming the resentment of his people against the English. He visited the governor in war costume, bearing in his belt a glittering hatchet, and demanded some concessions for his incensed people. It was refused, and, forgetting himself for a moment, he snatched the hatchet from his belt and struck its keen blade into a log of the cabin, uttering a curse upon the English. Instantly recovering himself, he ,smiled, and said: " Pardon me, governor; I was thinking of that wicked Englishman (see ARGALL, SAMUEL) who stole my niece and struck me with his sword. I love the English who are the friends of Powhatan. Sooner will the skies fall than that my bond of friendship with the English shall be dissolved." Sir Francis warned the people that treachery was abroad. They did not believe it. They so trusted the Indians that they had taught them to hunt with fire-arms.
  • A tempest suddenly burst upon them. On April 1, 1622, the Indians rushed from the forests upon all the remote settlements, at a preconcerted time, and in the space of an hour 350 men, women, and children were slain. At Henrico, the devoted Thorpe, who had been like a father to the children and the sick of the natives, was slain. Six members of the council and several of the wealthier inhabitants were made victims of the treachery.
  • On the very morning of the massacre the Indians ate at the tables of those whom they intended to murder at noon. The people of Jamestown were saved by Chanco, a Christian Indian, who gave them timely warning, and enabled them to prepare for the attack. Those on remote plantations who survived beat back the Indians and fled to Jamestown. In the course of a few days eighty of the inhabited plantations were reduced to eight. A large part of the colony were saved, and these waged an exterminating war. They struck such fearful retaliating blows that the Indians were beaten back into the forest, and death and desolation were spread over the peninsula between the York and James rivers. The emperor fled to the land of the Pamunkeys, and by a show of cowardice lost much of his influence. The power of the confederacy was broken. Before the war there were 6,000 Indians within 60 miles of Jamestown; at its close there were, probably, not 1,000 within the territory of 8,000 square miles. The colony, too, was sadly injured in number and strength. A deadly hostility between the races continued for more than twenty years. Opechancanough lived, and had been nursing his wrath all that time, prudence alone restraining him from war. His malice remained keen, and his thirst for vengeance was terrible. (Sons of the South Website)
  • [15] The record is not clear as to possible casualties at Jordan’s Journey. We could find none reported. The following report could be interpreted as implying that all survived: “Master Samuel Jordan gathered together but a few of the stragglers about him at Beggar’s Bush, where he fortified and lived in despite of the enemy.” (Woodrough)
  • Following Jordan’s noteworthy accomplishment, Governor Francis Wyatt decided that Jordan’s Journey could remain in operation while most of the other plantations were abandoned indefinitely – as much as a year or more. This was a defensive move in which colonists were told to cluster around Jamestown in the event of another massive attack by the Powhatan alliance. (Woodrough)
  • Opechancanough was shot in the back and killed in 1644 at the approximate age of 100. Some reports say a colonist did this on the streets of Jamestown. Others say a jailer did it after Opechancanough was captured. No matter which version is correct, the cowardly deed was by no means a proud moment in American history. (Woodrough)
  • [17] From Hotten's From Persons of Quality:

"A List of Names; of the Living in Virginia, February the 16, 1623 - "Living At Jordan's Jorney"

  • Sislye Jordan
  • Temperance Baylife
  • Mary Jordan
  • Margery Jordan
  • William Farrar
  • (37 more names follow the above listed.)
  • [18] The excavation report notes that the area where Jordan’s Journey was situated was first occupied by the Weyanokes, part of the Powhatan alliance and one of the many relatively small Native American kingdoms throughout the region. (Woodrough)
  • [19] Cecily Jordan and William Farrar continued to live at Jordan's Journey for several years until he patented the neck of land at the former site of the city of Henricus known as Farrar's Island. (Mayes)

-------------------- This Branch of the Jordan family probably originated in France and become associated with the reform movement (huguenots). They went to England and eventually came to the New World.

King James I of England granted a charter for settling two plantations in America; one in the Massachusetts area and the other in the Virginia area. The charter for the southern area was granted in 1606.

In December, 1606, three small ships and 104 colonists left England and arrived in Viriginia, May 14, 1607. This colony at Jamestown, VA, became the first permanent English Colony, notwithstanding the fact that it almost collapsed a time or two.

Samuel Jordan (1578-1623), the first of the Jordans to come to America, left Plymouth, England on June 18, 1609, and sailed for James Towne with the interim governor, Sir Thomas West. They sailed on the Seaventure with Sixe hundred land men in a fleet of eight good ships and one pinnance under the command of Sir George Somers, Somers flotilla encountered a severe storm near the Bermudas, which left the Seaventure unseaworthy. The other ships continued on their way to Jamestown. The passengers of the Seaventure, including Governor West, Samuel Jordan, and the Flotilla Commander, Sir George Somers, decided to stay in Bermuda and build two new ships, instead of attempting to repair the Seaventure, in order to carry additional food and supplies the island provided. Samuel Jordan was elected to keep the day-to-day journal because he was well educated.

Samuel's log serves as the basis of much of our information today. The shipwrecked persons built two new ships, the Patience and the Deliverer partly out of the wreckage of the Seaventure. They set sail again for James Towne, May 10, 1610, and arrived on July 25, 1610.

His first wife, whom he married in England, probably died before he departed for America. She was dead by 1620 as he was considered a special catch for any eligible woman at that time.

Samuel Jordan was a member of the first House of Burgesses, the first legislative body in the Western World, a representative of James City, convened at James City, July 30, 1619, by Sir George Yardley, Knight, governor and Captaine General of Virginia.

A land grant of 450 acres was conveyed by Gov. Yardley, December 10,. 1620, to Samuel and Cecily Jordan, which lay on the south side of the James river just below the confluence of the Appomattox with the James, and he called his plantation "Jordan's Journey". He built a manor house on it which he spoke of as "Beggars' Bush". Both Samuel and Cicely have been accored the title of "Ancient Planter, by Virginia. When an Indian uprising occured in that vicinty on March 22, 1622, Samuel gathered his family and neighbors into his home, fortified it, and survived. But his son, Robert, was killed by the Indians.

From: http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/t/a/Larry-R-Stanley/GENE9-0001.html Thanks are also due to Jordan researchers Barbara Hamman (( vada26@aol.com )) and Claudia Cox Welton (( coxwelton@home.com )).

Samuel Jordan was aboard the Seaventure, as were Sir Thomas Gates, the Governor, and Sir George Somers. A sever storm was encountered off the coast of Bermuda in the latter part of July 1609. The Seaventure was wrecked beyond repair. The other ships outrode the storm and proceeded to Jamestown with the Seaventure's cargo, but none of her passengers.

The officers and crew of the Seaventure remained on the coast of Bermuda for nine months building two ships, aptly named Patience and Deliverer. The ships arrived at Jamestown in May 1610. Samuel Jordan, an educated man, was assigned the task of keeping a record of events which are found in Hakluytls "Voyages, Travels and Discoveries.

In 1618 Samuel married Cicely a widow with a young daughter, Temperance Bailey. Cicely was born in England in 1600 and arrived in America in 1610 aboard the Swan. I have also read that she was his cousin through William Phippen and Joan Jordaine.

Samuel Jordan was a member of the first House of Burgesses, a representative of St. James City, which was convened in 1619 by George Yeardley, Governor and Captain general of Virginia. This was the first legislative body to convene in America.

A land grant of four hundred and fifty acres was made at St. James City in 1620 to Samuel and Cicely. He patented the land, which lay on the south side of the James River just below the confluence of the Appomattox with the James. He called his plantation "Jordan's Journey" or "Jordan's Point." Both Samuel and Cicely were accorded the title of Ancient Planters.

Samuel Jordan and Cicely received land grants for being "Ancient Planters". On one of these grants on the south side of James River, Samuel built a very large plantation called "Jordan's Journey", where he and his family survived the Indian Massacre. However, Samuel died the following year in March 1623 at his home, called "Beggars Bush" (present locationis Prince George Co., Virginia). When the Indian Massacre-occurred in March 1622, Samuel gathered his family and neighbors into his home and fortified it. His son, Robert, was killed by the Indians "at Berkley-Hundred some five miles from Charles City." Although it would seem that Thomas Jordan had several children, only one is on record.

Thomas Jordan II was born in Virginia in 1634; died 1700. He married Margaret Brashere in 1659, the daughter of Robert Brashere of Huguenot decent.

He was the first Quaker of his family and became very prominent in that faith. He had ten sons, some of whom became Quaker ministers, and two daughters. All his children were born in Nansemond County, Virginia.

Samuel's name is inscribed on the momument erected on the site of Jamestown Virginia. In 1619 he was a nember of the first House of Burgesses, from Charles City. Samual Jordan came to america on June 10, 1610 -------------------- Children of Samuel Jordan and ??, all born England, and all followed their father to the New World:

Anne Marie (Jordan) Hulet, born England 1596, married Laurence Hulet. Robert Jordan, born England 1598, immigrated 1619 (as a Bridewell immigrant), died 22 Mar 1622 in the Great Indian Massacre of 1622. Thomas Jordan, born England 1600, immigrated to the Virginia Colony aboard the Diana in 1620, married Lucy (Corker) Jordan (born 1605), and died 1644. Samuel Jordan, born England 1608.

Later married Cicely ? Bailey

 

Katherine Semark was the sister of Ann Semark, Ann was the favoured sister and inherited her Aunties Cheyne Buckinghamshire wealth. It is known that the Semark family was out of favour after Bosworth. It was Ann’s marriage to David Phelip a close member of the Earl of Richmond’s court and the Cheyne fortune that resulted into a family of position within the Court of Henry VIII.  Whilst the Semark main male lines came to an end the female lines are related to the main court families namely Norfolk, Bedford and Burghley.  Ann also inherited the Semark Manor of Thornhaugh, whilst it seems Katherine inherited nothing of standing..

 

From early english records [1386-1486] it can be seen that the Semark and Vincent families had a dispute over the Manor of Barnack, Northamptonshire “John Cory and Agnes, his wife, daughter of Richard, son of John Vyncent and Margaret, his wife v Thomas Semark, esquire, feoffee to uses : Manor of Barnack: Northampton”. This dispute can be dated as post 1440. Bernack was sold by the Vincent family to Lord Burghley, a Semark descendant, likely prior to 1598 [year Baron Burghley died].

 

Katherine Semark married Robert Vincent of Barnack in 1455. This marriage is recorded in the 1619 Herald’s Visitation of Northamptonshire. From the 1662-68 Herald’s Visitation of Surrey it can be seen that this Vincent family is related to the Vincents of Stoke D’Abernon.

 

The Vincent Crest below is based on the Visitation of Surrey 1662-8. The Vincent and the Semark families both had Northamptonshire ties.

The pedigree at the time of Visitation was given as

 

Sir Frances Vincent of Stoke Dawbernoune in Com.Surry Knt and Bart

Married

Sarah daughter of Sir Antho Pawlett of Hendon St George in Com. Southton, Knt.

 

Son

 

Sir Anthony Vincent of Stoke Dawbernoune in Com. Surry Knt and Bart

Married

Elizabeth daughter of Sir Arthur Ackland of Ackland in Com. Devon Knt

 

Son

 

Sir Francis Vincent of Stoke Dabernoune in Com Surry, Knt and Bart

Married

Katherine daughter of George Pitt of Harrow on ye Hill in Com.Midd esqr

 

Children

 

Anthony Son and heire aet 18 Ano 1662

Francis

Arthur

Thomas

Henry

Elizabeth

 

 

 

Extract from : The History and Antiquities of the County of Surrey.

 

The family Vincent was settled at Swinford, in Lincolnshire, so early as 10 Edward II. 1317, and remained there till the time of Henry IV. About 1409, when they removed to Bernack or Bernake, in Northamptonshire, on marrying a daughter and heiress of Sir John Bernack, and continued to reside there till David Vincent Esq. 7th in descent from that marriage, settled at Long Ditton, in Surrey, about the time of Henry VIII. His son  Sir Thomas Vincent, who married the heiress of Lyfield, sold Bernack to Lord Burghley, the latter obtaining from Queen Elizabeth for him Comb Nevill, in Kingston, and conveying to him the Manor of Cannon Court in Fecham; but he made Stoke his residence, and it was that of his descendants till lately. Sir Thomas was knighted at his house here 25th September 1601 by Queen Elizabeth on her making him a visit…….

 

John Vincent b. circa 1410

 

John Vincent was born circa 1410.He was the son of Richard Vincent and Elizabeth Spencer. John married Margaret Jordaine, daughter of John Jordaine, circa 1430.

 

Child of John Vincent and Margaret Jordaine:

Robert Vincent  born circa 1435

 

 

Robert Vincent born circa 1435

 

Robert Vincent was born circa 1435. He was the son of John Vincent and Margaret Jordaine. He married Katherine Semark, daughter of Thomas Semark, circa 1455.

 

Child of Robert Vincent and Katherine Semark:

Thomas Vincent  born circa 1460

 

 

Thomas Vincent born 1460

 

Thomas Vincent of Bernake in the reign of Edward IV. He was born circa 1460. He was the son of Robert Vincent and Katherine Semark. He married Cecily de Causton, daughter of Sir John de Causton, circa 1480.

 

John Vincent of Bernake, in the reign of Henry VII

 

Married Ann Hill daughter of Charles Hill.

 

David Vincent of Long Ditton, in the reign of Henry VIII

David son of John and Ann,  married 1. Elizabeth Spencer [before 1543] 2. Jane Rosey [Roffey] of the county of Worcester.

 

Sir Thomas Vincent 1543 - 1613

 

Thomas son of David and Elizabeth. Died December 1613 aged 70 [born 1543] married Jane daughter and heir of Thomas Lyfield Esq by Frances daughter and coheir of Edmund Lord Bray and Jane his wife.