[not me]  I am researching the Tadlock family and have been at wits end working on my wife's (Tadlock) Greatgrandmother's lineage.

From social security applications of her grandfather (and his brothers) I learned the name was Mary Charlotte Easley. Later, I found a family Bible that had the notation for Mary Charlotta Easley (side note stating her mother was full blood Cherokee) and that both Charlotta and her mother were from Mississippi.

Backtracking her greatgrandfather (Edward Jackson Tadlock, Jr) I found his family in the 1880 Federal Census for Wise County, Texas. About three or four houses down is the family for a William G. Easley, with a daughter named Mary C. and with a birth location listed as Mississippi. The wife was Margarett, also showing a Mississippi birth. (Another side note, inthe same area of Wise County, Texas are the following other households of the family Easley: John Q. Easley, a William C. Easley, and a Peter H. Easley). Regarding Peter H. Easley, he married Edward Jackson Tadlock Jr's sister Nancy Louisa Tadlock (children: Ezra Jackson Easley, Sam C. Easley, Richard McDonald Easley, and Mary Ethel Easley).

Now it gets fun.

The 1880 census report for William G. Easley reads as follows:

Wm. G. Easley/48/Head/AL/AL/AL
Margaret/46/Wife/MS/MS/MS
Mary C./16/Dau/MS/AL/MS
Louisa/12/Dau/KY/AL/MS
Leanna G./Dau/10/KY/AL/MS

Note: Edward and Mary were married in Wise county on Oct 5, 1884.

Thus, it seems that William G. was born in AL, and somewhere met Margaret, whose family is in MS. It would further appear that they lived a portion of time in MS, then moved to KY, and thence to TX.

Checking the 1870 Federal census for KY (Hickman,Fulton Co), I think I found him, but a few things are amiss.

Easley, W.G./36/Head/AL (no parent information shown)
Margaret/34/Wife/TN (rather than MS)
Martha E./19/Dau/AR
Wm. C./12/Son/MS
Mary C./8/Dau/MS
Eliza G./3/Dau/KY
James L./3/12/Son/KY

Hmmmmm. I wonder if Martha was a daughter from a previous marriage? But I have no tracking for her, she just disappears. Two sons (William and James) aren't listed in the 1880 Texas census. William would have been old enough to move on, but it appears that James might have passed away? The information for William G. and Margaret and Mary C. all seem to jive (with the exception of Margaret's birth state here listed as TN rather than MS). I wonder if the Eliza G. shown is the same shown as Louisa on the Texas census (the ages are about right).

Now ... from whom did William G. descend? I can not find him using the information provided by census (William G. Easley, born about 1832/33, in Alabama). I have searched files in Alabama, Arkansas (because of the birth location shown for daughter Martha), Mississippi, Tennessee (the alternate birth location shown for Margaret), and Texas.

It seems that William G. Easley (at least THIS one) just appeared out of the blue.

Any hints from ya'll?

(I guess this is why they call it "research")

Oh ... anyone doing the Tadlocks, I have quite an extensive file there, going back to about 1646 in England)

Re: ANOTHER William G. Easley Mystery (SOLVED)

JohnRay43  (View posts) Posted: 17 Feb 2004 9:39PM
Classification: Query
Edited: 8 Aug 2004 4:45PM

William G. Easley was one of 18 children of William M. Easley (1804-1888) from Alabama.

My wife's William G. Easley (father of Mary Charlotte Easley) came to Wise County Texas along with no less than three other siblings (Brother's Samuel Franklin, John Quincy, and Levi).

Two of Samuel Franklin's children (Peter H. Easley and nancy Elizabeth Easley) also married Tadlocks ... in fact, siblings of Edward Jackson Tadlock, who married Mary Charlotte. I guess they kept it all in the family.

Thus, Mary Charlotte Easley was a cousin to Peter H. Easley and Nancy Elizabeth Easley.

On to the next project or mystery.

Re: ANOTHER William G. Easley Mystery

Fpotus491  (View posts) Posted: 9 Mar 2004 8:40PM
Classification: Query
Edited: 11 Mar 2004 6:27PM
Surnames: Easley
I am in search of a James Easley who had a daughter named Juanita in Tn, on July 22, 1929. could this be the james you mentioned? please let me know
fpotus49@yahoo.com

Re: ANOTHER William G. Easley Mystery

JohnRay43  (View posts) Posted: 9 Mar 2004 9:28PM
Classification: Query
Edited: 8 Aug 2004 4:45PM

I have no record for where James went. He did not move to Texas with the family.

But, I would offer that he is most likely NOT the James you seek. In the 1870 census for Hickman, Fulton County, Kentucky, the James I record was 12 years old (and born in Kentucky). It is 59 years from the 1870 to 1929, and when you add 12 ... he would have been 71 years old at the time of the birth you mention.

Sorry.

EDWIN A. EASLEY

Sort

EDWIN A. EASLEY

Ladawn  (View posts) Posted: 9 Sep 2000 8:24AM GMT


I am trying to find any info on EDWIN A. EASLEY SR.B.4-30-1856 D.9-24-1933 married Gertrude Allen or falkner I am unsure which is her maiden nameB.12-03-1872in MS D.6-21-1964 in LA please e-mail me if you have any info Wonderfolks@aol.com

Re: EDWIN A. EASLEY

jenniyoungblood17  (View posts) Posted: 31 Jan 2006 9:03AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: easley
I am searching for my ggrandfather believed to be edwin easley-I found where he was buried in the Maple City Cemetery around Topeka ks and the people who gave information to the winfield courier on july 3, 1928 was canary easley(my grandmother) and a man named armildon james, I have no idea who he is. My grandmother was supposed to have been born in texas but I can't get past her so I'm hoping this is my ggrandfather-do you have the names of their children--all I have is ardath born feb 1896--william a. born dec 1898--edith v. born feb 1900-they show up in the 1900 census in shreveport city, la-It says that gertrude's father's name is allen h. williamson, so maybe that will help you-let's try to figure it out-good luck-jenni youngblood

Re: EDWIN A. EASLEY

BILLIEJOHNSON459  (View posts) Posted: 19 Apr 2007 6:45AM GMT
Classification: Query

I've just recently came across Edwin A and Gertrude F Easley while searching for Easley's in my family the LA Caddo county Shreveport census of 1900. Their children were Ardath B(daughter)b. Feb. 1896; and William A (son) b. Dec. 1898. Hopefully this helps. Good luck with your search.

Re: EDWIN A. EASLEY

TheKeepers  (View posts) Posted: 11 Feb 2010 8:37AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Easley, Faulkner, Allen
Hope you guys are still looking for Edwin Easley.... he was my gg-grandfather, my still living grandmother's grandfather. I have alot of information on him and Gertrude Faulkner(her middle name and mother's maiden name) Allen Easley. They are all buried at the historic cematary across from the police station in Shreveport, LA. I have traced Gertrude's line back to the Bedford's of VA. And her father, William Henry Allen is buried at Beauvois, in Biloxi, MS.

I have started looking for more information on Edwin's roots and he is from James Robert Easley (b. abt 1835) and Mahala C. Butler. They were married in Lafayette Cty, MS on 3/4/1856. They had 6 children, one of which was Edwin.

Now....it seems that Edwin had a wife before Gertrude. Her name was Annie Lennon (d. 10/1886). I think that she had twins born in 1884, Ernest and Edwin. Ernest ended up in San Diego and died in 1953. I have no idea where Edwin Easley Jr. ended up.....maybe that is the one buried in OK.

Once I get to JR. Easley I am stymied. I have no idea where his parents came from as the census records of 1840 and earlier do not list the family members. The only clue that I have are the children's names of course and that he lists his birth state as MS.

Now for some family tradition: Apparently, Gertrude was forced to marry Edwin as her father and Edwin were in business together. It was not a love match. Gertrude was buried with a picture of a Mr, Porter, the man she really wanted to marry. The census records are nutty about the ages but Edwin was significantly older than Gertrude.

Let me know if you have anything to add or more info on James Robert Easley.

Thanks.

Re: EDWIN A. EASLEY

crmlkwd  (View posts) Posted: 7 Mar 2010 8:00PM GMT
Classification: Query

I am also researching this Easley line. I am interested in any information you have concerning Edwin and Gertrude Easley family, particularly their children. I desend from Charlie Maloney Easley, son of Edwin and Gertrude, but don't know much about his brothers or sisters.

Re: EDWIN A. EASLEY

TheKeepers  (View posts) Posted: 16 Mar 2010 2:51AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Easley
Hi There,

It's really great to hear from you. I am the g granddaughter of William Henry Allen Easley and Allie Mae Johnson. William Henry Allen Easley was the son of Edwin and Gertrude. I have alot of history and lineage on Gertrude but unfortunately, very little history on Edwin's people. I have some but not alot. : / An interesting tidbit about Edwin and Gertrude, they named their children the full names of their grandparents. So my g-grandad was named after Gertrude's father.

William Henry Allen Easley and Allie Mae Johnson had 2 children, my grandmother Ella Gertrude Easley (still living) and Allen Harris Easley (died at 1 month).

I have dates for some of granny's (Gertrude Faulkner Allen Easley) kids but not all of them and would be happy to exchange info. Please feel free to email me at rkives.all@gmail.com off-list and we can compare notes. : )

I am thrilled to meet someone who is interested in the same Easley line as myself. whew!

Shannon

Re: EDWIN A. EASLEY

TheKeepers  (View posts) Posted: 28 Nov 2010 5:05AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Easley
Did you get the information that you needed regarding your Edwin Easley. After rereading your post I think that you have combined 2 families. The Edwin Easley buried in KS is not the Edwin Easley who married Gertrude in LA. Also, Edwin had a son named Edwin who WAS born in 1885 but he died in TN in 1966.

I bet you already have this figured out but I would feel bad if I didn't say something and it wasn't resolved.

Good Luck with your search,
Shannon

Re: EDWIN A. EASLEY

pfleniken  (View posts) Posted: 13 Aug 2011 7:28PM GMT
Classification: Query

James Robert Easley & Mahala Butler had 7 children; 4 living according to 1900 cnesus. The 7th being Nettie Easley. Nettie is m. to Magender Hoxie in 1930 census. Nettie had 3 girls and 1 boy.
Edwin Easley Sr. and Annie had 2 sons; 1900 census shows their birthdates 1 year apart; abt 1884 & 1885.
Edwin Easley Jr. m. Elizabeth (?) abt 1918 and had 1 dau, Mary Easley. Edwin Jr. d. 1966 in TN.

 

Grandfather was James F. Huskey I'm not certain of his date of birth... Around 1890's... He died the year before I was born... Around 1956... He married Mary Ethel Easley Mary was born June 13, 1891 in Fannin County, Texas. She died March 1, 1988 in Victoria, Texas. She married James Franklin HUSKEY on December 10, 1911 in Wewoka, Oklahoma Their children: 1. Veloria Virginia 2. Eugene Franklin 3. Kathryn Florence 4. Doris Ethel New Information on my grandfather... James F. He was born approximately 1890... No one has knowledge of Parents names... Other than his fathers last could possibly be: Jackson... And his mother went by the name of "MOTHER" Huskey... The story goes that his father went off to fight in the Civil War and never returned... His sister would be: Esther Huskey and a cousin we know of is Bill (William) Huskey...

 

Peter H. Easley was born in 1857 in Missouri. He married Nancy Louisa TADLOCK on August 7, 1882. Nancy was born about 1857 in Wise County, Texas and died about 1899 near Mena, Polk County, Arkansas. They had four children. Peter passed away in 1921 in Cole, McClain County, Oklahoma.

THEIR CHILDREN WERE:

1. EASLEY, Ezra Jackson--Born on August 22, 1884 in Paradise, Wise County, TX. He married Daviol Allenah MCGEHEE on November 6, 1909. They had four children. Daviol was born on July 16, 1885 in Texas and died August, 1979. Ezra died on December 19, 1969 in Cushing, Payne County, Oklahoma.

2. EASLEY, Samuel C.--Born on August 31, 1886 in Wise County, TX. Married Florence ELLIS in 1911 in Wewoka, Oklahoma. They had five children. Florence was born May 17, 1890 in Ponatoc, OK and died November 4, 1977 in San Antonio, Bexar County, TX. Samuel died on October 9, 1951 in Ada, Pontotoc County, OK.

3. EASLEY, Richard McDonald--Born October 5, 1888 in Texas. Married Elizabeth RUTZ on June 27, 1909 in Celeste, Hunt County, TX. They had six children. Elizabeth was born October 22, 1894 in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas and died August 25, 1972 in Greenville, Hunt County, TX. Richard died on June 1, 1958 in Celeste, Hunt County, TX.

4. EASLEY, Mary Ethel--Born June 13, 1891 in Fannin County, Texas. Married James Franklin HUSKEY on December 10, 1911 in Weoka, Seminole County, OK. Had four known children. James was born about 1890 and his death is unknown. Mary died on March 1, 1988 in Victoria, Victoria County, TX.

1920 Oklahoma, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma Federal Census: James Huskey age 29 and a mail carrier for U. S.. His wife Ethel age 28, daughter Deloris age 7, and son Eugene age 5 show with him.

EZRA SAMUEL EASLEY

Ezra Samuel Easley was born on July 25, 1864 in Wise County, Texas. He married Nancy Congoda WILLIAMS on August 29, 1892 in Wise County, TX. Nancy was born on January 22, 1874 and died on February 22, 1978 in Tulare, Tulare County, California. They had twelve children. Ezra died on January 8, 1943 in Tulare, Tulare County, CA.

THE CHILDREN OF THIS UNION:

1. EASLEY, Freddie--Born in Moral, Pottowatomi County, OK.

2. EASLEY, Gene

//////

 Hello,

Does anyone have any info on a Thomas (or Tom) TATLOCK, who was a singer and
dancer in Montreal and New York, from 1888 onwards. He was born in 1860 in
Bolton, Lancashire, UK. I believe he lived until at least the 1920's.

His first wife, Elizabeth TATLOCK nee BROCKBANK, was also a comic singer at
the music halls, in Bolton in the 1890's. She also went under the names of
Elizabeth Alice, Lucy Elizabeth and Ellen. As far as I know she did not go
to the US or Canada with Thomas.

If anyone can help with photos or programs etc, or any other information, or
just point me in the direction of where I may be able to find something, I'd
be very grateful.

Best wishes

Rachel Willis

Peter H. Easley was born in 1857 in Missouri. He married Nancy Louisa TADLOCK on August 7, 1882. Nancy was born about 1857 in Wise County, Texas and died about 1899 near Mena, Polk County, Arkansas. They had four children. Peter passed away in 1921 in Cole, McClain County, Oklahoma.

THEIR CHILDREN WERE:

1. EASLEY, Ezra Jackson--Born on August 22, 1884 in Paradise, Wise County, TX. He married Daviol Allenah MCGEHEE on November 6, 1909. They had four children. Daviol was born on July 16, 1885 in Texas and died August, 1979. Ezra died on December 19, 1969 in Cushing, Payne County, Oklahoma.

2. EASLEY, Samuel C.--Born on August 31, 1886 in Wise County, TX. Married Florence ELLIS in 1911 in Wewoka, Oklahoma. They had five children. Florence was born May 17, 1890 in Ponatoc, OK and died November 4, 1977 in San Antonio, Bexar County, TX. Samuel died on October 9, 1951 in Ada, Pontotoc County, OK.

3. EASLEY, Richard McDonald--Born October 5, 1888 in Texas. Married Elizabeth RUTZ on June 27, 1909 in Celeste, Hunt County, TX. They had six children. Elizabeth was born October 22, 1894 in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas and died August 25, 1972 in Greenville, Hunt County, TX. Richard died on June 1, 1958 in Celeste, Hunt County, TX.

4. EASLEY, Mary Ethel--Born June 13, 1891 in Fannin County, Texas. Married James Franklin HUSKEY on December 10, 1911 in Weoka, Seminole County, OK. Had four known children. James was born about 1890 and his death is unknown. Mary died on March 1, 1988 in Victoria, Victoria County, TX.

1920 Oklahoma, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma Federal Census: James Huskey age 29 and a mail carrier for U. S.. His wife Ethel age 28, daughter Deloris age 7, and son Eugene age 5 show with him.

EZRA SAMUEL EASLEY

Ezra Samuel Easley was born on July 25, 1864 in Wise County, Texas. He married Nancy Congoda WILLIAMS on August 29, 1892 in Wise County, TX. Nancy was born on January 22, 1874 and died on February 22, 1978 in Tulare, Tulare County, California. They had twelve children. Ezra died on January 8, 1943 in Tulare, Tulare County, CA.

THE CHILDREN OF THIS UNION:

1. EASLEY, Freddie--Born in Moral, Pottowatomi County, OK.

2. EASLEY, Gene

//////

 Hello,

Does anyone have any info on a Thomas (or Tom) TATLOCK, who was a singer and
dancer in Montreal and New York, from 1888 onwards. He was born in 1860 in
Bolton, Lancashire, UK. I believe he lived until at least the 1920's.

His first wife, Elizabeth TATLOCK nee BROCKBANK, was also a comic singer at
the music halls, in Bolton in the 1890's. She also went under the names of
Elizabeth Alice, Lucy Elizabeth and Ellen. As far as I know she did not go
to the US or Canada with Thomas.

If anyone can help with photos or programs etc, or any other information, or
just point me in the direction of where I may be able to find something, I'd
be very grateful.

Best wishes

Rachel Willis

Peter H Easley
Unknown-Unknown

Spouses & Children
James Franklin Huskey
Unknown-Unknown
Summerall
Unknown-Unknown

 

Edward Jackson Tadlock (1822 - 1860)

Born in Illinoise on 1822 to Thomas Tatlocke and Catherine David. Edward Jackson married Jane Elizabeth Chapman and had 7 children. He passed away on 1860 in Wise Cotx.

Edward Jackson's Family Members

Parents
Catherine David
1804-Unknown

Spouses & Children

Jane Elizabeth Chapman (1825 - 1880)

Born in Tennessee, USA on 1825 to Thomas Chapman and Rachel Garrison. Jane Elizabeth married Edward Jackson Tadlock and had 7 children. She passed away on 1880.

Jane Elizabeth's Family Members

Parents

Spouses & Children

Thomas Tatlocke
ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree

Brother of William Tatlocke descendants, Edward Tatlocke, Margaret H. Tatlocke, John Tatlocke and Edward Tatlocke

*
William Tatlocke
15 Nov 1615 - 26 Feb 1658
ancestors ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree family group view descendants
*
Richard Tatlocke
-
ancestors ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree descendants
* John Tatlocke
-
ancestors ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree descendants
* [Great-Great-Grandfather?]
* [Great-Great-Grandmother?]
* Katerine Unknown
-
ancestors ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree descendants
* [Great-Great-Grandfather?]
* [Great-Great-Grandmother?]
*
Elizabeth Cradocke
-
ancestors ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree descendants
* [Great-Grandfather?] *
*
* [Great-Grandmother?] *
*
*
Ellen Fazakerly
-
ancestors ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree family group view descendants
* [Maternal Grandfather?] *
*
*
*
*
*
* [Maternal Grandmother?] *
*
*
John Tatlocke shareable tree family group view descendants Help
Born [date unknown] in England, 1560map
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of Katerine Unknown — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Father of Richard Tatlocke
Died [date unknown] in England, 1598map
Profile manager: Timmy Davis private message [send private message] | Last profile change on 15 April 2011
23:33: Timmy Davis edited the Spouse for John Tatlocke. [Thank Timmy for this]
Katerine Tatlocke formerly Unknown shareable tree family group view descendants Help
Born [date unknown] [location unknown]
Daughter of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Wife of John Tatlocke — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Mother of Richard Tatlocke
Born [date unknown] in England 1580map
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of Elizabeth Cradocke — married December 23, 1593 in Church of St.Peter-St.Paul, Ormskirk,Lancashire,Englandmap
Died [date unknown] in Englandmap
Born November 15, 1615 in Meling Lancashire, Englandmap
Husband of Ellen Fazakerly — married April 14, 1655 in Melng Lancashire, Englandmap
Died February 26, 1658 [location unknown]
Thomas Tatlocke ancestors ahnentafel printable tree shareable tree Help
Born [date unknown] [location unknown]
Brother of William Tatlocke, Edward Tatlocke, Margaret H. Tatlocke, John Tatlocke and Edward Tatlocke
Born [date unknown] in England 1580map
Daughter of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Wife of Richard Tatlocke — married December 23, 1593 in Church of St.Peter-St.Paul, Ormskirk,Lancashire,Englandmap
Mother of Ann Tatlocke, Ellen Tatlocke, Thomas Tatlocke, Mary Tatlocke, William Tatlocke, Elizabet Tatlocke, Henry Tatlocke and John Tatlocke
Born [date unknown] [location unknown]
Daughter of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Wife of William Tatlocke — married April 14, 1655 in Melng Lancashire, Englandmap
   Tatlock, Absalom to Sarah Jackson  2-5-1806, David Jackson Edmd B Harvey

Tatlock, Allen to Joseph Gregory 3-29-1828 Bond Date, Bondsman John Tatlock

Tatlocke, Alley to Joseph Gregory Perq. 1828

Tadlock, Deborah to Wm. Bedgood Perq 1808

Tatlock, James to Elizabeth Stafford 5-13-1817, John Miller John Wood

Tatlock, James (colored) to Elizabeth Wright 1-24-1811, Thomas Tatlock John Wood

Tadlock, James age 33 = Mother, Jane Tadlock
Sawyer, Clennie age 16 = Father, J. H Sawyer & E. E.
Feb 7, 1892, By B. F. Gregory, JP
Wit: John Tadlock; J. T. Britt

Tadlock, James age 24 = Father, Lancaster Tadlock & __________(Jane Turner)
Margaret Sawyer age 18 = Father, Willis Sawyer & ___________
Sept 8, 1877 By A. A. Perry, JP
Wit: C. P. Perry; J, G. Barcliff

Tadlock, James E. age 21 = Father, James Tadlock & Clennie Ceplan or Copeland
Gray, Lessie age 17 = Father, Ben G. Gray & Sally Ann
Feb 3, 1918, By J. A. Davis, JP

Tadlock, Jesse age 24 = Father, L. Tadlock & Jane
Gregory, Olivia age 20 = Father,William Gregory and Margaret
March 3, 1875 Married by S. B. Harrell, JP.

Tatlock , Jesse to Elizabeth Pool 10-20-1830, Thomas Wilson

Tatlock, Joshua to Anna Whidbee 7-29-1811, Demcy Tatlock John Wood

Tadlock, Lanchaster to Jane Turner 12-10-1850

Tatlock, Lemeul to Ellen White 1-5-1849

Tadlock , Myles to Martha Sutton 10-12-1808

Tatlock, Martin to Marey Reed 6-6-1833, Leml Weeks John Wood

Tadlock, Nathan to Grizell Morse 11-25-1855

Tadlock, Mariah to William Moss (Morse) Perq. 1835

Tatlock, Sylas to Sutton, Martha 10-12-1806

Tatlock , Thomas to Elizabeth Burnham 1-29-1827, Francis White John Wood

Tatlock, Thomas (colored) to Nancey Knox 8-29-1810, James Tatlock John Wood

Tadlock, William age 22 = Father, John Tadlock & Margaret
Griffin, Hattie age 18 = Father, Henry Griffin and Kesiah
Dec 5, 1898 By B. F Humphries, JP, Moyock, NC
Wit: Andrew Stevenson; Dock Morse

Tatlocke, Millicent to David Jackson Perq. 1806

 


of 727


Peter H. Easley was born in 1857 in Missouri. He married Nancy Louisa TADLOCK on August 7, 1882. Nancy was born about 1857 in Wise County, Texas and died about 1899 near Mena, Polk County, Arkansas. They had four children. Peter passed away in 1921 in Cole, McClain County, Oklahoma.

THEIR CHILDREN WERE:

1. EASLEY, Ezra Jackson--Born on August 22, 1884 in Paradise, Wise County, TX. He married Daviol Allenah MCGEHEE on November 6, 1909. They had four children. Daviol was born on July 16, 1885 in Texas and died August, 1979. Ezra died on December 19, 1969 in Cushing, Payne County, Oklahoma.

2. EASLEY, Samuel C.--Born on August 31, 1886 in Wise County, TX. Married Florence ELLIS in 1911 in Wewoka, Oklahoma. They had five children. Florence was born May 17, 1890 in Ponatoc, OK and died November 4, 1977 in San Antonio, Bexar County, TX. Samuel died on October 9, 1951 in Ada, Pontotoc County, OK.

3. EASLEY, Richard McDonald--Born October 5, 1888 in Texas. Married Elizabeth RUTZ on June 27, 1909 in Celeste, Hunt County, TX. They had six children. Elizabeth was born October 22, 1894 in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas and died August 25, 1972 in Greenville, Hunt County, TX. Richard died on June 1, 1958 in Celeste, Hunt County, TX.

4. EASLEY, Mary Ethel--Born June 13, 1891 in Fannin County, Texas. Married James Franklin HUSKEY on December 10, 1911 in Weoka, Seminole County, OK. Had four known children. James was born about 1890 and his death is unknown. Mary died on March 1, 1988 in Victoria, Victoria County, TX.

1920 Oklahoma, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma Federal Census: James Huskey age 29 and a mail carrier for U. S.. His wife Ethel age 28, daughter Deloris age 7, and son Eugene age 5 show with him.

EZRA SAMUEL EASLEY

Ezra Samuel Easley was born on July 25, 1864 in Wise County, Texas. He married Nancy Congoda WILLIAMS on August 29, 1892 in Wise County, TX. Nancy was born on January 22, 1874 and died on February 22, 1978 in Tulare, Tulare County, California. They had twelve children. Ezra died on January 8, 1943 in Tulare, Tulare County, CA.

THE CHILDREN OF THIS UNION:

1. EASLEY, Freddie--Born in Moral, Pottowatomi County, OK.

2. EASLEY, Gene

//////

 Hello,

Does anyone have any info on a Thomas (or Tom) TATLOCK, who was a singer and
dancer in Montreal and New York, from 1888 onwards. He was born in 1860 in
Bolton, Lancashire, UK. I believe he lived until at least the 1920's.

His first wife, Elizabeth TATLOCK nee BROCKBANK, was also a comic singer at
the music halls, in Bolton in the 1890's. She also went under the names of
Elizabeth Alice, Lucy Elizabeth and Ellen. As far as I know she did not go
to the US or Canada with Thomas.

If anyone can help with photos or programs etc, or any other information, or
just point me in the direction of where I may be able to find something, I'd
be very grateful.

Best wishes

Rachel Willis

/////

John, do you know if your Mary Easley was married to a Cosley before marrying Edward Jackson Tadlock? Marriage of Edward Tadlock to Mary Cosley 5 Oct 1884 in Wise County, TX. Sarah Elizabeth Tadlock, sister to Edward, married John Fredrick Smith. They are the great great grandparents of my children. I am researching their paternal lines. Would be glad to share what I have on the Tadlock line.

I have no record of Mary having been previously married, but I have significant other info on the Tadlock line.
Edward "Jack" Tadlock had four sisters (Martha, Mary Ann, Sarah, and Nancy) and two brothers (Richard and John). Richard married who I presume to be Mary's sister, Nancy Elizabeth Easley.
Edward (Jack) and Sarah Elizabeth's parents were Edward Jackson Tadlock and Jane Chapman. His parents were Edward Jackson and Catherine (?). His parents were Lewis Tadlock and Charlotte Padfield. His parents were Thomas Tadlock and Elizabeth (?). Thomas' father was Edward Tatlocke (born abt 1680, Childwall (Lancashire) England) who came to America in 1702. 

////(Edward Tatlocke: 1680 through to present) About 400 or so entries?

Birth: May 14, 1889
Chattanooga
Hamilton County
Tennessee, USA
Death: May 16, 1957
San Antonio
Bexar County
Texas, USA

 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Mary Ethel Easley Huskey (1891 - 1988)
 
Burial:
San Fernando Cemetery #3
San Antonio
Bexar County
Texas, USA
Grandfather was James F. Huskey I'm not certain of his date of birth... Around 1890's... He died the year before I was born... Around 1956... He married Mary Ethel Easley Mary was born June 13, 1891 in Fannin County, Texas. She died March 1, 1988 in Victoria, Texas. She married James Franklin HUSKEY on December 10, 1911 in Wewoka, Oklahoma Their children: 1. Veloria Virginia 2. Eugene Franklin 3. Kathryn Florence 4. Doris Ethel New Information on my grandfather... James F. He was born approximately 1890... No one has knowledge of Parents names... Other than his fathers last could possibly be: Jackson... And his mother went by the name of "MOTHER" Huskey... The story goes that his father went off to fight in the Civil War and never returned... His sister would be: Esther Huskey and a cousin we know of is Bill (William) Huskey...
 
I would appreciate any information...
Thanks so much ahead of time...
Terry Shumaker Mikeska
 

 

 

Burial: 12 Jan 1747/8 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
John Tatlock -
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 78, Entry 19
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
 

/In a letter to Cromwell, Wyatt complains: "I have such a pain in my head that it grieveth me to write or read. This town of Toledo is dangerous for the head" 

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=055-ddm_2&cid=13-7#13-7

http://tudorplace.com.ar/PLANTAGENET3.htm#Arthur%20PLANTAGENET%20%28V.%20Lisle%29

Family of John WOODVILLE and Katherine of NEVILLE

Husband: John WOODVILLE (1444-1469)
Wife: Katherine of NEVILLE (1397-1483)
Marriage "1/1465"

Husband: John WOODVILLE

Name: John WOODVILLE
Sex: Male
Father: Richard WOODVILLE (1405-1469)
Mother: Jaquetta of LUXEMBOURG ( - )
Birth 1444
Death 12 Aug 1469 (age 24-25)

Additional Information

Death Cause: beheaded on the orders of Warwick

Wife: Katherine of NEVILLE

Name: Katherine of NEVILLE
Sex: Female
Father: Ralph of NEVILLE (1364-1425)
Mother: Joan of BEAUFORT (1374-1440)
Birth 1397
Occupation
Duchess of Norfolk
Death 1483 (age 85-86)

Note on Husband: John WOODVILLE

Sir John Woodville (1444? – 12 August 1469) was the second son, and fourth child, of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquetta of Luxembourg.

 

In January 1465, John's sister Elizabeth, Queen Consort to Edward IV, procured his marriage to Catherine Neville, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk, who was aunt to the powerful Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick. As the Duchess was about 68 years of age at the time and John was only 20, the marriage was seen by all, particularly Warwick, as an indecent grasp for money and power by the Woodville family.

 

In 1469, John and his father accompanied King Edward on a march north, to put down what was thought to be a minor rebellion supporting Edward's brother the Duke of Clarence as the legitimate king. Before they met the rebels both Clarence and Warwick had announced their support for the rebellion; by the time Edward met the rebels, the rebel force was far stronger than his. In a parley, the rebels told Edward that they had no fight with Edward but advised him to distance himself from the Woodvilles. In no position to argue, Edward sent the Woodville party away.

 

John and Rivers went first to the Rivers' house at Grafton and from there made their way westwards towards Wales. They were captured by Warwick's men on the western bank of the Severn and taken to Warwick in Coventry.

 

Before leaving Calais to support the uprising, Warwick had published a manifesto citing the Woodvilles in general, and the Earl and John specifically, as his reason for supporting Clarence against the king. The publication of this manifesto was deemed, by Warwick, to justify the execution of Rivers and his son. They were beheaded on 12 August and their heads placed on spikes above the gates of Coventry.

 

Unsurprisingly, there was no issue from the marriage of John Woodville and the Catherine Neville.

Note on Wife: Katherine of NEVILLE

Katherine Neville or Catherine de Neville (born c. 1397 – died after 1483[1]) was the eldest daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland (1364–1425) and Joan Beaufort (c. 1379-1440), daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster by his mistress (later, 3rd wife) Catherine de Roet.[2]

 

Katherine was married firstly to John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (1392–1432). Their only known child was:

 

John de Mowbray, 3rd Duke of Norfolk (1415–1461).

Katherine married secondly, Thomas Strangeways (c. 1395-before 1442) [3] - they had 2 daughters:

 

Joan Strangeway, married Sir William Willoughby.[4]

Catherine Strangeway [1]

She married thirdly John, Viscount Beaumont, who was killed in 1460.

 

Her fourth and last marriage was infamous, and known by contemporaries as the 'diabolical marriage'[1] - she married John Woodville, brother of Elizabeth Woodville, Edward IV's queen. He would have been barely twenty at the time of their marriage - she in her mid to late sixties. Yet she survived even him as he was executed in 1469 during the brief period of time that her nephew - Richard, Earl of Warwick (The 'Kingmaker') had usurped the authority of the crown. She was still alive in 1483, having survived all the descendents of her first marriage.[1]


Richard (1411-1460)
Wife: Cecile of NEVILLE (1415-1495)
Children: Anne of YORK (1439- )

George of YORK (1441- )

Edward IV (1442- )

Edmund (1443- )

Elizabeth of YORK (1444- )

Margaret of YORK (1446- )

George PLANTAGENET (1449- )
Marriage "10/1429"

Husband: Richard

      picture    
      Richard, Richard -Duke of York    
 
Name: Richard
Sex: Male
Father: Richard of CONISBURGH (1375-1415)
Mother: Anne of MORTIMER (1390-1411)
Birth 21 Sep 1411
Occupation
Duke of York
Death 30 Dec 1460 (age 49)

Wife: Cecile of NEVILLE

Name: Cecile of NEVILLE
Sex: Female
Father: Ralph of NEVILLE (1364-1425)
Mother: Joan of BEAUFORT (1374-1440)
Birth 1415 Raby Castle, Durham, England
Occupation
Duchess of York
Death 31 May 1495 (age 79-80)
Burial
Fotheringhay Church, Northamptonshire, England

Child 1: Anne of YORK

Name: Anne of YORK
Sex: Female
Birth 10 Aug 1439

Child 2: George of YORK

Name: George of YORK
Sex: Male
Birth 1441

Child 3: Edward IV

Name: Edward IV
Sex: Male
Birth 28 Apr 1442

Child 4: Edmund

Name: Edmund
Sex: Male
Birth 17 May 1443

Child 5: Elizabeth of YORK

Name: Elizabeth of YORK
Sex: Female
Birth 22 Apr 1444

Child 6: Margaret of YORK

Name: Margaret of YORK
Sex: Female
Birth 3 May 1446

Child 7: George PLANTAGENET

Name: George PLANTAGENET
Sex: Male
Birth 21 Oct 1449

Note on Husband: Richard

He was the second child of Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge and Anne Mortimer. Anne was the senior heiress of Lionel of Antwerp, the second surviving son of Edward III; this arguably gave her and her family a superior claim to the throne over that of the House of Lancaster. Anne died giving birth to Richard. He was a younger brother of Isabel, Countess of Essex.

 

His paternal grandparents were Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York (the fourth son of Edward III to survive infancy) and Isabella of Castile. His maternal grandparents were Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March and Alianore Holland.

 

His father was executed for his part in the Southampton Plot against Henry V on 5 August 1415, and attainted. Richard therefore inherited neither lands nor title from his father. However his paternal uncle Edward of Norwich, 2nd Duke of York, who was killed at the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415, was childless and Richard was his closest male relative.

 

After some hesitation Henry V allowed Richard to inherit the title and (at his majority) the lands of the Duchy of York. The lesser title and (in due course) greater estates of the Earldom of March also became his on the death of his maternal uncle Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March, on 19 January 1425. The reason for Henry's hesitation was that Edmund Mortimer had been proclaimed several times to have a stronger claim to the throne than Henry's father, Henry IV of England, by factions rebelling against him. However, during his lifetime, Mortimer remained a faithful supporter of the House of Lancaster.

 

Richard of York already had the Mortimer and Cambridge claims to the English throne; once he inherited the March,[1] he also became the wealthiest and most powerful noble in England, second only to the King himself.[2]

 

[edit] Childhood and upbringingAs an orphan, the income and management of Richard's lands became the property of the crown. Even though many of the lands of his uncle of York had been granted for life only, or to him and his male heirs, the remaining lands, concentrated in Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire, Yorkshire, and Wiltshire and Gloucestershire were considerable. The wardship of such an orphan was therefore a valuable gift of the crown, and in October 1417 this was granted to Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland, with the young Richard under the guardianship of Sir Robert Waterton. Ralph Neville had fathered an enormous family (twenty-three children, twenty of whom survived infancy, through two wives) and had many daughters needing husbands. As was his right, in 1424 he betrothed the 13-year-old Richard to his daughter Cecily Neville, then aged 9.

 

In October 1425, when Ralph Neville died, he bequeathed the wardship of York to his widow, Joan Beaufort. By now the wardship was even more valuable, as Richard had inherited the Mortimer estates on the death of the Earl of March. These manors were concentrated in Wales, and in the Welsh Borders around Ludlow.

 

Little is recorded of Richard's early life. On 19 May 1426 he was knighted at Leicester by John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, the younger brother of Henry V. In October 1429 (or earlier) his marriage to Cecily Neville took place. On 6 November he was present at the formal coronation of Henry VI in Westminster Abbey. He then followed Henry to France, being present at his coronation as King of France in Notre Dame on 16 December 1431. Finally, on 12 May 1432 he came into his inheritance and was granted full control of his estates.

 

[edit] France (1436–1439)In May 1436, a few months after Bedford's death, York was appointed to succeed him as Lieutenant in France. Henry V's conquests in France could not be sustained forever, as the Kingdom of England either needed to conquer more territory to ensure permanent French subordination, or to concede territory to gain a negotiated settlement. During Henry VI's minority, his Council took advantage of French weakness and the alliance with Burgundy to increase England's possessions, but following the Treaty of Arras (1435), Burgundy ceased to recognise the King of England's claim to the French throne.

 

York's appointment was one of a number of stop-gap measures after the death of Bedford to try to retain French possessions until King Henry should assume personal rule. The fall of Paris (his original destination) led to his army being redirected to Normandy. Working with Bedford's captains, York had some success, recapturing Fecamp and holding on to the Pays de Caux, while establishing good order and justice in the Duchy of Normandy. However, he was dissatisfied with the terms under which he was appointed, as he had to find much of the money to pay his troops and other expenses from his own estates.[3] His term of office was nevertheless extended beyond the original twelve months, and he returned to England in November 1439. In spite of his position as one of the leading nobles of the realm, he was not included in Henry VI's Council on his return.[4]

 

[edit] France again (1440–1445)Henry turned to York again in 1440 after peace negotiations failed. He was reappointed Lieutenant of France on 2 July, this time with the same powers that the late Bedford had earlier been granted. As in 1437, York was able to count on the loyalty of Bedford's supporters, including Sir John Fastolf and Sir William Oldhall.

 

However, in 1443 Henry put the newly-created John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset in charge of an army of 8,000 men, initially intended for the relief of Gascony. This denied York much-needed men and resources at a time when he was struggling to hold the borders of Normandy. Not only that, the terms of Somerset's appointment could have caused York to feel that his own role as effective regent over the whole of Lancastrian France was reduced to that of governor of Normandy. Somerset's army achieved nothing, and eventually returned to Normandy, where Somerset died. This may have been the start of the hatred that York felt for the Beaufort family, that would later turn into civil war.

 

English policy now turned back to a negotiated peace (or at least a truce) with France, so the remainder of York's time in France was spent in routine administration and domestic matters. Duchess Cecily had accompanied him to Normandy, and his children Edward, Edmund and Elizabeth were born in Rouen.

 

[edit] Ireland (1445–1450)York returned to England on 20 October 1445, at the end of his five-year appointment in France. He must have had reasonable expectations of reappointment. However, he had become associated with the English in Normandy who were opposed to policy of Henry VI's Council towards France, some of whom (for example Sir William Oldhall and Sir Andrew Ogard) had followed him to England. Eventually (in December 1446) the lieutenancy went to Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset, who had succeeded his brother John. During 1446 and 1447 York attended meetings of Henry VI's Council and of Parliament, but most of his time was spent in administration of his estates on the Welsh border.

 

His attitude toward the Council's surrender of Maine, in return for an extension of the truce with France and a French bride for Henry, must have contributed to his appointment on 30 July as Lieutenant of Ireland. In some ways it was a logical appointment, as Richard was also Earl of Ulster and had considerable estates in Ireland, but it was also a convenient way of removing him from both England and France. His term of office was for ten years, ruling him out of consideration of any other high office during that period.

 

Domestic matters kept him in England until June 1449, but when he did eventually go, it was with Cecily (who was pregnant at the time) and an army of around 600 men. This suggests a stay of some time was envisaged. However, claiming lack of money to defend English possessions, York decided to return to England. His financial state may indeed have been problematic, since by the mid-1440s he was owed nearly £40,000 by the crown, and the income from his estates was declining.

 

[edit] Leader of the Opposition (1450–1452)In 1450, the defeats and failures of the previous ten years boiled over into serious political unrest. In January, Adam Moleyns, Lord Privy Seal and Bishop of Chichester, was lynched. In May the chief councillor of the King, William de la Pole, 1st Duke of Suffolk, was murdered on his way into exile. The House of Commons demanded that the King take back many of the grants of land and money he had made to his favourites.

 

In June, Kent and Sussex rose in revolt. Led by Jack Cade (taking the name Mortimer), they took control of London and killed John Fiennes, 1st Baron Saye and Sele, the Lord High Treasurer of England. In August, the final towns held in Normandy fell to the French, and refugees flooded back to England.

 

On 7 September, York landed at Beaumaris. Evading an attempt by Henry to intercept him, and gathering followers as he went, York arrived in London on 27 September. After an inconclusive (and possibly violent) meeting with the King, York continued to recruit, both in East Anglia and the west. The violence in London was such that Somerset, back in England after the collapse of English Normandy, was put in the Tower of London for his own safety. In December Parliament elected York's chamberlain, Sir William Oldhall, as speaker.

 

York's public stance was that of a reformer, demanding better government and the prosecution of the traitors who had lost northern France. Judging by his later actions, there may also have been a more hidden motive — the destruction of Somerset, who was soon released from the Tower. Although granted another office (Justice of the Forest south of the Trent), York still lacked any real support outside Parliament and his own retainers.

 

In April 1451, Somerset was released from the Tower and appointed Captain of Calais. When one of York's councillors, Thomas Young, the MP for Bristol,proposed that York be recognised as heir to the throne, he was sent to the Tower and Parliament was dissolved. Henry VI was prompted into belated reforms, which went some way to restore public order and improve the royal finances. Frustrated by his lack of political power, York retired to Ludlow.

 

In 1452, York made another bid for power, but not to become king himself. Protesting his loyalty, he aimed to be recognised as Henry VI's heir apparent (Henry was childless after seven years of marriage), while also trying to destroy the Earl of Somerset, who Henry may have preferred to succeed him over York, as a Beaufort descendant. Gathering men on the march from Ludlow, York headed for London, to find the city gates barred against him on Henry's orders. At Dartford in Kent, with his army outnumbered, and the support of only two of the nobility, York was forced to come to an agreement with Henry. He was allowed to present his complaints against Somerset to the king, but was then taken to London and after two weeks of virtual house arrest, was forced to swear an oath of allegiance at St Paul's Cathedral.

 

[edit] Protector of the Realm (1453–1454)By the summer of 1453, York seemed to have lost his power struggle. Henry embarked on a series of judicial tours, punishing York's tenants who had been involved in the debacle at Dartford. His Queen consort, Margaret of Anjou, was pregnant, and even if she should miscarry, the marriage of the newly ennobled Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond to Margaret Beaufort provided for an alternative line of succession. By July, York had lost both his Offices: Lieutenant of Ireland and Justice of the Forest south of the Trent.

 

Then, in August, Henry VI suffered a catastrophic mental breakdown. Perhaps brought on by the news of the defeat at the Battle of Castillon in Gascony, which finally drove English forces from France, he became completely unresponsive, unable to speak and having to be led from room to room. The council tried to carry on as though the King's disability would be brief. However, eventually they had to admit that something had to be done. In October, invitations for a Great Council were issued, and although Somerset tried to have him excluded, York (the premier Duke of the realm) was included. Somerset's fears were to prove well-grounded, for in November he was committed to the Tower. Despite the opposition of Margaret of Anjou, on 27 March, York was appointed Protector of the Realm and Chief Councillor.

 

York's appointment of his brother-in-law, Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, as Chancellor was significant. Henry's burst of activity in 1453 had seen him try to stem the violence caused by various disputes between noble families. These disputes gradually polarised around the long-standing Percy-Neville feud. Unfortunately for Henry, Somerset (and therefore the king) became identified with the Percy cause. This drove the Nevilles into the arms of York, who now for the first time had support among a section of the nobility.

 

[edit] St. Albans (1455–1456)According to the historian Robin Storey, "If Henry's insanity was a tragedy, his recovery was a national disaster".[5] When he recovered his reason in January 1455, Henry lost little time in reversing York's actions. Somerset was released and restored to favour. York was deprived of the Captaincy of Calais (which was granted to Somerset once again) and of the office of Protector. Salisbury resigned as Chancellor. York, Salisbury and Salisbury's eldest son, Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, were threatened when a Great Council was called to meet on 21 May in Leicester (away from Somerset's enemies in London). York and his Neville relations recruited in the north and probably along the Welsh border. By the time Somerset realised what was happening, there was no time to raise a large force to support the king.

 

Once York took his army south of Leicester, thus barring the route to the Great Council, the dispute between him and the king regarding Somerset would have to be settled by force. On 22 May, the king and Somerset arrived at St Albans, with a hastily-assembled and poorly-equipped army of around 2,000. York, Warwick and Salisbury were already there, with a larger and better-equipped army. More importantly, at least some of their soldiers would have had experience in the frequent border skirmishes with the Kingdom of Scotland and the occasionally rebellious people of Wales.

 

The First Battle of St Albans which immediately followed hardly deserves the term battle. Possibly as few as 50 men were killed, but among them were Somerset and the two Percy lords, Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland and Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford. York and the Nevilles had therefore succeeded in killing their enemies, while York's capture of the king gave him the chance to resume the power he had lost in 1453. It was vital to keep Henry alive, as his death would have led, not to York becoming king himself, but to the minority rule of his two-year-old son Edward of Westminster. Since York's support among the nobility was small, he would be unable to dominate a minority council led by Margaret of Anjou.

 

In the custody of York, the king was returned to London with York and Salisbury riding alongside, and with Warwick bearing the royal sword in front. On 25 May, Henry received the crown from York, in a clearly symbolic display of power. York made himself Constable of England, and appointed Warwick Captain of Calais. York's position was enhanced when some of the nobility agreed to join his government, including Lord Fauconberg, who had served under him in France.

 

For the rest of the summer York held the king prisoner, either in Hertford castle or (in order to be enthroned in Parliament in July) in London. When Parliament met again in November the throne was empty, and it was reported that the king was ill again. York resumed the office of Protector, although he surrendered it when the king recovered in February 1456, it seemed that this time Henry was willing to accept that York and his supporters would play a major part in the government of the realm.

 

Salisbury and Warwick continued to serve as councillors, and Warwick was confirmed as Captain of Calais. In June, York himself was sent north to defend the border against a threatened invasion by James II of Scotland. However, the king once again came under the control of a dominant figure, this time one harder to replace than Suffolk or Somerset: for the rest of his reign, it would be the queen, Margaret of Anjou, who would control the king.

 

[edit] Loveday (1456–1458)Although Margaret of Anjou had now taken the place formerly held by Suffolk or Somerset, her position, at least at first, was not as dominant. York had his Lieutenancy of Ireland renewed, and he continued to attend meetings of the Council. However, in August 1456 the court moved to Coventry, in the heart of the Queen's lands. How York was treated now depended on how powerful the Queen's views were. York was regarded with suspicion on three fronts: he threatened the succession of the young Prince of Wales; he was apparently negotiating for the marriage of his eldest son Edward into the Burgundian ruling family; and as a supporter of the Nevilles, he was contributing to the major cause of disturbance in the kingdom – the Percy/Neville feud.

 

Here, the Nevilles lost ground. Salisbury gradually ceased to attend meetings of the council. When his brother Robert Neville, Bishop of Durham died in 1457, the new appointment was Laurence Booth. Booth was a member of the Queen's inner circle. The Percys were shown greater favour both at court and in the struggle for power on the Scottish Border.

 

Henry's attempts at reconciliation between the factions divided by the killings at St Albans reached their climax with the Loveday on 24 March 1458. However, the lords concerned had earlier turned London into an armed camp, and the public expressions of amity seemed not to have lasted beyond the ceremony.

 

[edit] Ludford (1459)In June 1459 a great council was summoned to meet at Coventry. York, the Nevilles and some other lords refused to appear, fearing that the armed forces that had been commanded to assemble the previous month had been summoned to arrest them. Instead, York and Salisbury recruited in their strongholds and met Warwick, who had brought with him his troops from Calais, at Worcester. Parliament was summoned to meet at Coventry in November, but without York and the Nevilles. This could only mean that they were to be accused of treason.

 

On 11 October, York tried to move south, but was forced to head for Ludlow. On 12 October, at the Battle of Ludford Bridge, York once again faced Henry just as he had at Dartford seven years earlier. Warwick's troops from Calais refused to fight, and the rebels fled – York to Ireland, Warwick, Salisbury and York's son Edward to Calais.[6] York's wife Cecily and their two younger sons (George and Richard) were captured in Ludlow Castle and imprisoned at Coventry.

 

[edit] The wheel of fortune (1459–1460)York's flight worked to his advantage. He was still Lieutenant of Ireland, and attempts to replace him failed. The Parliament of Ireland backed him, providing offers of both military and financial support. Warwick's (possibly inadvertent) return to Calais also proved fortunate. His control of the English Channel meant that pro-Yorkist propaganda, emphasising loyalty to the king while decrying his wicked councillors, could be spread around Southern England. Such was the Yorkists' naval dominance that Warwick was able to sail to Ireland in March 1460, meet York and return to Calais in May. Warwick's control of Calais was to prove to be influential with the wool-merchants in London.

 

In December 1459 York, Warwick and Salisbury had suffered attainder. Their lives were forfeit, and their lands reverted to the king; their heirs would not inherit. This was the most extreme punishment a member of the nobility could suffer, and York was now in the same situation as Henry of Bolingbroke in 1398. Only a successful invasion of England would restore his fortune. Assuming the invasion was successful, York had three options — become Protector again, disinherit the king so that York's son would succeed, or claim the throne for himself.

 

On 26 June, Warwick and Salisbury landed at Sandwich. The men of Kent, always ready to revolt, rose to join them. London opened its gates to the Nevilles on 2 July. They marched north into the Midlands, and on 10 July, they defeated the royal army at the Battle of Northampton (through treachery among the King's troops), and captured Henry, who they brought back to London.

 

York remained in Ireland. He did not set foot in England until 9 September, and when he did, he acted as a king. Marching under the arms of his maternal great-great-grandfather Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, as he approached London he displayed a banner of the Coat of Arms of England.

 

A Parliament which was called to meet on 7 October, repealed all the legislation of the Coventry parliament the previous year. On 10 October, York arrived in London and took residence in the royal palace. Entering Parliament with his sword borne upright before him, he made for the empty throne and placed his hand upon it, as if to occupy it. He may have expected the assembled peers to acclaim him as King, as they had acclaimed Henry Bolingbroke in 1399. Instead, there was silence. Thomas Bourchier, the Archbishop of Canterbury, asked whether he wished to see the King. York replied, "I know of no person in this realm the which oweth not to wait on me, rather than I of him." This high-handed reply did not impress the Lords.[7]

 

The next day, Richard advanced his claim to the crown by hereditary right, in proper form. However, his narrow support among his peers led to failure once again. After weeks of negotiation, the best that could be achieved was the Act of Accord, by which York and his heirs were recognised as Henry's successor. However, Parliament did grant York extraordinary executive powers to protect the realm, and with the king effectively in custody, York and Warwick were the de facto rulers of the country.

 

[edit] Final campaign and deathWhile this was happening, the Lancastrian loyalists were rallying and arming in the north of England. Faced with the threat of attack from the Percys, and with Margaret of Anjou trying to gain the support of new king James III of Scotland, York, Salisbury and York's second son Edmund, Earl of Rutland headed north on 2 December. They arrived at York's stronghold of Sandal Castle on 21 December to find the situation bad and getting worse. Forces loyal to Henry controlled the city of York, and nearby Pontefract Castle was also in hostile hands.

 

On 30 December, York and his forces sortied from Sandal Castle. Their reasons for doing so are not clear; they were variously claimed to be a result of deception by the Lancastrian forces, or treachery, or simple rashness on York's part.[8] The larger Lancastrian force destroyed York's army in the resulting Battle of Wakefield. York was killed in the battle. Edmund of Rutland was intercepted as he tried to flee and was executed, possibly by John Clifford, 9th Baron de Clifford in revenge for the death of his own father at the First Battle of St Albans. Salisbury escaped but was captured and executed the following night.

 

York was buried at Pontefract, but his head was put on a pike by the victorious Lancastrian armies and displayed over Micklegate Bar at York, wearing a paper crown. His remains were later moved to Fotheringhay Church.[9]

 

None of his affinity (or his enemies) left a memoir of him. All that remains is the record of his actions, and the propaganda issued by both sides. Faced with the lack of evidence, his intentions can only be inferred from his actions. Few men have come so close to the throne as York, who died not knowing that in only a few months his son Edward would become king. Even at the time, opinion was divided as to his true motives. Did he always want the throne, or did Henry VI's poor government and the hostility of Henry's favourites leave him no choice? Was the alliance with Warwick the deciding factor, or did he just respond to events?

 

[edit] LegacyWithin a few weeks of Richard of York's death, his eldest surviving son was acclaimed King Edward IV, and finally established the House of York on the throne following a decisive victory over the Lancastrians at the Battle of Towton. After an occasionally tumultuous reign, he died in 1483 and was succeeded by his son as Edward V, and York's youngest son succeeded him as Richard III.

 

Richard of York's grandchildren included Edward V and Elizabeth of York. Elizabeth married Henry VII, founder of the Tudor dynasty and became the mother of Henry VIII, Margaret Tudor and Mary Tudor. All subsequent English monarchs have been descendants of Elizabeth of York.

 

[edit] Titles, styles, honours and arms[edit] Arms

Coat of arms of Richard, 3rd Duke of YorkWith the dukedom of York, Richard inherited the associated arms of his ancestor, Edmund of Langley. These arms were those of the kingdom, differentiated by a label argent of three points, each bearing three torteaux gules.[10]

 

[edit] AncestryRichard was descended from English and Castilian royalty, as well as several major English aristocratic families.

 

[show]Ancestors of Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York

 

 

16. Edward II of England

 

 

 

8. Edward III of England

 

 

 

17. Isabella of France

 

 

 

4. Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York

 

 

 

18. William I, Count of Hainaut

 

 

 

9. Philippa of Hainault

 

 

 

19. Joan of Valois

 

 

 

2. Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge

 

 

 

20. Alfonso XI of Castile

 

 

 

10. Peter of Castile

 

 

 

21. Maria of Portugal

 

 

 

5. Isabella of Castile, Duchess of York

 

 

 

22. Juan García de Padilla, 1st Señor de Villagera

 

 

 

11. María de Padilla

 

 

 

23. María Fernández de Henestrosa

 

 

 

1. Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York

 

 

 

24. Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March

 

 

 

12. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March

 

 

 

25. Philippa Montacute

 

 

 

6. Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March

 

 

 

26. Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (son of 8)

 

 

 

13. Philippa, 5th Countess of Ulster

 

 

 

27. Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster

 

 

 

3. Anne de Mortimer

 

 

 

28. Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent

 

 

 

14. Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent

 

 

 

29. Joan of Kent

 

 

 

7. Alianore Holland

 

 

 

30. Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel

 

 

 

15. Alice Fitzalan

 

 

 

31. Eleanor of Lancaster

 

 

 

 

[edit] IssueHis children with Cecily Neville include:

 

Joan of York (b. 1438, died young).

Anne of York (10 August 1439 – 14 January 1476), consort to Henry Holland, 3rd Duke of Exeter.

Henry of York (b. 10 February 1441, died young).

Edward IV of England (28 April 1442 – 9 April 1483).

Edmund, Earl of Rutland (17 May 1443 – 31 December 1460).

Elizabeth of York (22 April 1444 – after January, 1503), consort to John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk. (His first wife was Margaret Beaufort).

Margaret of York (3 May 1446 – 23 November 1503). Married to Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy.

William of York (b. 7 July 1447, died young).

John of York (b. 7 November 1448, died young).

George, Duke of Clarence (21 October 1449 – 18 February 1478). Married to Isabel Neville. Parents of Margaret Pole whose husband's mother was the half-sister of Margaret Beaufort.

Thomas of York (born c. 1451, died young).

Richard III of England (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485). Married to Anne Neville, the sister of Isabel Neville.

Ursula of York (born 22 July 1455, died young).

Richard, 3rd Duke of York, 6th Earl of March, 4th Earl of Cambridge, and 7th Earl of Ulster conventionally called Richard of York (21 September 1411 – 30 December 1460) was a leading English magnate, great-grandson of King Edward III. He inherited great estates, and served in various offices of state in France at the end of the Hundred Years' War, and in England, ultimately governing the country as Lord Protector during Henry VI's madness. His conflicts with Henry's queen, Margaret of Anjou, and other members of Henry's court were a leading factor in the political upheaval of mid-fifteenth-century England, and a major cause of the Wars of the Roses. Richard eventually attempted to claim the throne but was dissuaded, although it was agreed that he would become King on Henry's death. Within a few weeks of securing this agreement, he died in battle.

 

Although Richard never became king, he was the father of Edward IV and Richard III.

Note on Wife: Cecile of NEVILLE

Cecily Neville, Duchess of York (3 May 1415 – 31 May 1495)[1] was the wife of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and the mother of two Kings of England: Edward IV and Richard III.

 

Cecily Neville was a daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland. Her maternal grandparents were John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Katherine Swynford. John of Gaunt was the third son of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault.

 

She was the aunt of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, the most powerful peer and military commander in 15th-century England, where he was also known as "The Kingmaker".

 

Cecily was called "the Rose of Raby" (because she was born at Raby Castle in Durham, Kingdom of England) and "Proud Cis" because of her pride and a temper that went with it. Historically she is also known for her piety. She herself signed her name "Cecylle".

 

In 1424, when Cecily was nine years old, she was betrothed by her father to his thirteen year old ward, Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York. Ralph Neville died in October 1425, bequeathing the wardship of Richard to his widow, Joan Beaufort. Cecily and Richard were married by October 1429. Their daughter Anne was born in August 1439 in Northamptonshire. When Richard became a king's lieutenant and governor general of France in 1441 and moved to Rouen, Cecily moved with him. Their son Henry was born in February but died soon after.

 

The future Edward IV was born in Rouen on 28 April 1442 and immediately privately baptised in a small side chapel. He would later be accused of illegitimacy directly by his cousin, Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, and by his own brother, George, Duke of Clarence; this was probably because George and Warwick were in dispute with Edward and seeking to overthrow him. The claims would later be dismissed. Some modern historians use Edward's date of birth as an evidence of illegitimacy: the Duke had been away in the calculated days of conception and the baby's baptism was a simple and private affair (unlike that of his younger brother, George, which was public and lavish). Although some historians suggest that the baby was prematurely born, there are no surviving records of this. Other historians point out that Cecily's husband could easily, by the military conventions of the time, have returned briefly to Rouen, where Cecily was living at the time. In any case, Richard acknowledged the baby as his own which establishes legal paternity.

 

Around 1454, when Richard began to resent the influence of Edmund Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset, Cecily spoke with Queen consort Margaret of Anjou on his behalf. When Henry VI suffered a nervous breakdown later in the year, Richard of York established himself as a Protector.

 

After the outbreak of the Wars of the Roses, Cecily remained at their home, Ludlow Castle, even when Richard fled to Ireland and Continental Europe. At the same time she surreptitiously worked for the cause of the House of York. When a parliament began to debate the fate of the York and his supporters in November 1459, Cecily travelled to London to plead for her husband. One contemporary commentator stated that she had reputedly convinced the king to promise a pardon if the Duke would appear in the parliament in eight days. This failed and Richard's lands were confiscated, but Cecily managed to gain an annual grant of £600 to support her and her children.

 

After the Yorkist victory at the Battle of Northampton in July 1460, Cecily moved to London with her children and lived with John Paston. She carried the royal arms before Richard in triumph in London in September. When the Duke of York and his heirs officially recognized as Henry VI's successors in the Act of Accord, Cecily became a queen-in-waiting and even received a copy of the English chronicle from the chronicler John Hardyng.

 

In the Battle of Wakefield (30 December 1460), the Lancastrians won a decisive victory. The Duke of York, his second son Edmund, Earl of Rutland and Cecily's brother Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury were among the casualties. Cecily sent her two youngest sons, George and Richard to the court of Philip III, Duke of Burgundy. This forced Philip to ally with the Yorkists.

 

[edit] Mother of two kingsHer eldest son Edward successfully continued the fight against the Lancastrians. When Cecily moved to Baynard's Castle in London, it became the Yorkist headquarters and when Edward defeated the Lancastrians, she became an effective Queen Mother.

 

During the beginning of the Edward's reign, Cecily appeared beside him and maintained her influence. In 1461 she revised her coat of arms to include the royal arms of England, hinting that her husband had been a rightful king. When Edward married Elizabeth Woodville, he built new queen's quarters for her and let his mother remain in the queen's quarters in which she had been living.

 

In 1469, her nephew, the Earl of Warwick, father-in-law of her sons George and Richard, rebelled against Edward IV. Warwick also begun to spread rumours that the king was a bastard and that his true father was not the Duke of York but an archer named Blaybourne at Rouen, evidence of which has been assembled.[2] By some interpretations, that would have meant that Clarence was the rightful king. Warwick had earlier made similar accusations against Margaret of Anjou. Cecily said little about the matter in public, despite the fact that she had been accused of adultery. She visited Sandwich, possibly trying to reconcile the parties. When the rebellion failed the first time, she invited Edward and George to London to reconcile them. Peace did not last long and in the forthcoming war she still tried to make peace between her sons.

 

Edward IV was briefly overthrown by Warwick and Margaret of Anjou, and for about six months (October 1470 - April 1471) Henry VI was restored to the throne. The breach between Edward and his brother George was apparently never really healed, for George was executed for treason in the Tower of London on 18 February 1478. Edward IV died suddenly on 9 April 1483, leaving two sons aged 13 and 10. Cecily Neville's youngest son Richard, their uncle, was appointed their protector by Edward's will, but he had them placed in the Tower, whence they were never to emerge. The subsequent enquiry found that that Edward IV's marriage to Elizabeth Woodville had been invalid: their children were thus illegitimate, making Richard the legal heir to the crown. The Princes in the Tower were declared illegitimate by Act of Parliament in 1483 allowing their uncle, Richard, to be crowned Richard III on 6 July 1483. The Princes in the Tower were supposed to have been murdered around this time.

 

She was on good terms with Richard's wife, Anne Neville, with whom she discussed religious works such as the writings of Mechtilde of Hackeborn.[3]

 

Richard's reign was brief, as he was defeated and killed on 22 August 1485 at the Battle of Bosworth Field by the last Lancastrian, Henry Tudor. Thus, by 1485 Cecily's husband and four sons had all died, although two of her daughters, Elizabeth and Margaret, still lived. On 18 January 1486, Cecily's granddaughter, Elizabeth of York, eldest daughter of Edward IV, married Henry VII and thus became Queen. Cecily devoted herself to religious duties and her reputation for piety comes from this period.

 

Cecily Neville died in 31 May 1495 and was buried in the tomb with Richard and their son Edmund at Fotheringhay Church, Northamptonshire, with a papal indulgence. All subsequent English monarchs, beginning with Henry VIII, are descendants of Elizabeth of York, and therefore of Cecily Neville.

 

[edit] AncestryAncestors of Cecily Neville[show]

 

16. Ralph Neville, 1st Baron Neville de Raby

 

 

 

8. Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby

 

 

 

17. Euphemia Clavering

 

 

 

4. John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby

 

 

 

18. Hugh Audley

 

 

 

9. Alice Audley

 

 

 

19. Isolda Mortimer

 

 

 

2. Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland

 

 

 

20. Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy

 

 

 

10. Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy

 

 

 

21. Eleanor Fitzalan

 

 

 

5. Maud Percy

 

 

 

22. Robert Clifford

 

 

 

11. Idonea Clifford

 

 

 

23. Maud de Clare

 

 

 

1. Cecily Neville

 

 

 

24. Edward II of England

 

 

 

12. Edward III of England

 

 

 

25. Isabella of France

 

 

 

6. John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster

 

 

 

26. William I, Count of Hainaut

 

 

 

13. Philippa of Hainault

 

 

 

27. Joan of Valois

 

 

 

3. Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland

 

 

 

28. Paon de Roet

 

 

 

14. Payne Roet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. Katherine Swynford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[edit] IssueHer children with Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York include:

 

1.Anne of York (10 August 1439 – 14 January 1476), wife of Henry Holland, 3rd Duke of Exeter and secondly, Sir Thomas St. Leger.

2.George of York (February 1441 – February 1441), died soon after his birth.

3.Edward IV of England (28 April 1442 – 9 April 1483).

4.Edmund, Earl of Rutland (17 May 1443 – 31 December 1460).

5.Elizabeth of York (22 April 1444 – after January, 1503), wife of John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk.

6.Margaret of York (3 May 1446 – 23 November 1503). Married Charles I, Duke of Burgundy.

7.George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence (21 October 1449 – 18 February 1478).

8.Richard III of England (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485).

 

 

Family of Ralph of NEVILLE and Joan of BEAUFORT

Husband: Ralph of NEVILLE (1364-1425)
Wife: Joan of BEAUFORT (1374-1440)
Children: Eleanor of NEVILLE (1379-1441)

Katherine of NEVILLE (1397-1483)

Richard of NEVILLE (1400- )

Anne of NEVILLE (1411- )

George NEVILLE (1414-1469)

William of NEVILLE ( - )

Edward of NEVILLE (1414-1476)

Cecile of NEVILLE (1415-1495)
Marriage 29 Nov 1396 Chateau de Beaufort, Meuse et Loire, France

Husband: Ralph of NEVILLE

Name: Ralph of NEVILLE
Sex: Male
Father: John of NEVILLE (1328-1388)
Mother: Maude of PERCY (1335-1378)
Birth 1364 Castle Raby. Raby with Keverstone, Durham, England
Occupation
Earl of Westmoreland
Death 24 Oct 1425 (age 60-61) Castle Raby. Raby with Keverstone, Durham, England

Wife: Joan of BEAUFORT

Name: Joan of BEAUFORT
Sex: Female
Father: John of GAUNT (1340-1399)
Mother: Katherine SWYNFORD (1350-1403)
Birth 29 Jan 1374 Beaufort Castle, Anjou, France
Death 13 Nov 1440 (age 66) Howden, Yorkshire, England
Burial
Lincoln Cathedral, Lincolnshire

Child 1: Eleanor of NEVILLE

Name: Eleanor of NEVILLE
Sex: Female
Spouse: Ralph of LUMLEY ( - )
Birth 1379
Death 1441 (age 61-62)

Child 2: Katherine of NEVILLE

Name: Katherine of NEVILLE
Sex: Female
Spouse 1: John MOWBRAY (1392-1432)
Spouse 2: Thomas STRANGEWAYS (1395-1442)
Spouse 3: John ( - )
Spouse 4: John WOODVILLE (1444-1469)
Birth 1397
Occupation
Duchess of Norfolk
Death 1483 (age 85-86)

Child 3: Richard of NEVILLE

Name: Richard of NEVILLE
Sex: Male
Birth 1400

Child 4: Anne of NEVILLE

Name: Anne of NEVILLE
Sex: Female
Birth 1411

Child 5: George NEVILLE

Name: George NEVILLE
Sex: Male
Spouse: Elizabeth of BEAUCHAMP (1417- )
Birth 1414 Raby, Durham. England
Occupation
Lord Latimer
Title
Lord Latimer
Death 30 Dec 1469 (age 54-55)

Child 6: William of NEVILLE

Name: William of NEVILLE
Sex: Male

Child 7: Edward of NEVILLE

Name: Edward of NEVILLE
Sex: Male
Spouse 1: Elizabeth of BEAUCHAMP ( -1448)
Spouse 2: Katherine HOWARD ( - )
Birth 1414
Occupation
Baron of Bergavenny
Death 18 Oct 1476 (age 61-62)

 

In 1565 Sir Thomas Gerard of Bryn sold his moiety to Sir Richard Molyneux of Sefton; (fn. 19) and the latter's grandson, Sir Richard, purchased the other moiety in 1596 from Thomas Stanley alias Halsall, upon whom it had been conferred by his father, Henry, earl of Derby. (fn. 20) The Molyneux family thus acquired the whole of the manor, and it has since descended in the same way as Sefton, the earl of Sefton being the present lord. (fn. 21)

Ingewaith gave a surname to a resident family, of which few particulars can be given. (fn. 22) A branch of the Norris family settled here in the fifteenth century; (fn. 23) as also a branch of the Torbocks. (fn. 24) William Fazakerley was a freeholder in 1600, (fn. 25) and his grandson William in 1628 contributed to the subsidy. (fn. 26) The Tatlocks of Kirkby appear on the recusant roll of 1641. (fn. 27) Thomas Barker had his lands sequestered for recusancy by the Commonwealth. (fn. 28) In 1717 James Harrison of Grange, Thomas Tatlock, and William Sheppard as 'papists' registered estates here. (fn. 29) Lord Sefton, Edward Standish, and Thomas Tatlock were the principal landowners in 1785. (fn. 30)

 

Burial: 9 Jul 1727 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Thomas Tatlock -
    Abode: Simonswood
    Notes: a Papist
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 59, Entry 6
    Source: LDS Film 1545852 Burial: 10 Dec 1728 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Edward Tatlock - Son of John
    Abode: [West] Derby
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 61, Entry 1
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 13 Jun 1729 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Emma Tatlock, Widow -
    Abode: Simonswood
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 62, Entry 12
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 27 Nov 1729 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
James Tatlock - child of Tatlock, Widow
    Abode: Simonswood
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 63, Entry 10
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 7 Jan 1729/30 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Edward Tatlock, Junr -
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 63, Entry 18
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 7 Jan 1729/30 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Edward Tatlock, Junr -
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 63, Entry 18
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 19 Feb 1729/30 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Mary Tatlock - child of Margaret Tatlock, Widow
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 63, Entry 22
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 25 Feb 1729/30 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Ellen Tatlock - child of William
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 63, Entry 25
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 3 Apr 1730 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Matthias Tatlock -
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 64, Entry 1
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 3 Apr 1730 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Matthias Tatlock -
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 64, Entry 1
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 24 Feb 1730/1 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Robert Tatlock -
    Buried by: William Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 64, Entry 25
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 4 Dec 1732 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Ellin Tatlock, Widow -
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 66, Entry 4
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 17 Jan 1732/3 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
John Tatlock - child of William
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 66, Entry 7
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 25 Nov 1734 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
William Tatlock -
    Abode: Liverpool
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 67, Entry 11
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 13 May 1735 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Elizabeth Tatlock, Spinster -
    Abode: Knowsley
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 67, Entry 25
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 5 Nov 1735 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Edward Tatlock - Son of William
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 68, Entry 9
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 29 Jun 1736 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Clares Tatlock - child of John
    Abode: Fazakerly
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 69, Entry 1
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 29 Jun 1736 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Clares Tatlock - child of John
    Abode: Fazakerly
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 69, Entry 1
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 29 Jun 1736 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Clares Tatlock - child of John
    Abode: Fazakerly
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 69, Entry 1
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 23 Apr 1737 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Mary Tatlock, Widow -
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 69, Entry 22
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 28 Aug 1738 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Edward Tatlock -
    Notes: [Will of Edward Tatlock, yeoman of Kirkby, proved 1738]
    Buried by: Wm Mount
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 71, Entry 6
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 6 Jul 1742 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
William Tatlock -
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 74, Entry 12
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 31 Jul 1747 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
William Tatlock -
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 78, Entry 10
    Source: LDS Film 1545852Burial: 12 Jan 1747/8 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
John Tatlock -
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 78, Entry 19
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
  Burial: 12 Jan 1747/8 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
 
Burial: 24 Jan 1747/8 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Edward Bal - child of John
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 78, Entry 20
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
 

Burial: 12 Jan 1747/8 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
John Tatlock -
    Register: Burials 1727 - 1775, Page 78, Entry 19
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
 

MELLING, a chapelry in the parish of HALSALL, hundred of WEST DERBY, county palatine of LANCASTER, 6¼ miles (S.S.W.) from Ormskirk, containing 528 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the archdeaconry and diocese of Chester, endowed with £400 private benefaction, £200 royal bounty, and £1400 parliamentary grant. The Earl of Lonsdale was patron in 1796. The chapel is dedicated to Holy Rood. A school was founded by the lords of Melling, with a residence for the master, about 1700, to which, in 1709, Edward Smith bequeathed the residue of his personal estate, and in 1712, John Tatlock gave £20; there are about twenty-five free scholars, and the master's income is £25 per annum. 

Burial: 20 Nov 1678 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
John Tatlock - Son of Will Tatlock
    Notes: Certified by Mr Entwistle 21 Nov
    Register: Burials 1678 - 1727, Page 3, Entry 3
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
 
Burial: 22 Nov 1678 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
William Tatlock - Son of Edward Tatlock
    Notes: Certified by Mr Morras 29 Dec
    Register: Burials 1678 - 1727, Page 3, Entry 4
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
 
Burial: 16 Dec 1678 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Joane Watt -
    Notes: Certified by Mr Entwistle 21 Dec
    Register: Burials 1678 - 1727, Page 3, Entry 5
    Source: LDS Film 1545852
 
Burial: 7 Jan 1678/9 Kirkby Chapel, Walton, Lancashire, England
Martha Tatlock - Wife of Edward Tatlock
    Notes: Certified by Mr Chorley 9 Jan
    Register: Burials 1678 - 1727, Page 3, Entry 6
    Source: LDS Film 1545852

9 Jun 1697   William Tatlock & Catharine Hawke

Tatlock, Ellen, of Kirkby 1683

Tatlock, Henry, of Thornton Hough Admon 1700

Tatlock, John, of Dale 1691

Tatlock, Thomas, of Garston 1695

Tatlock, Thomas, of Ormskirk 1683

Tatlock, William, of Liverpool, cooper 1699

 

1738 Jan 25 Eleanor TATLOCK widow of Knowsley  
1738 Mar 23 Samuel HARRISON  
1738 Apr 6 Ellin BILLINGE widow of Windle in ye parish of Prescot  
1738 May 23 Thomas GUY a young man of Knowsley  
1738 Jun 8 William SPENCER  
1738 Jul 3 John a child of William BILLINGE of Windle  
1738 Aug 13 Anne a child of Edward BOYERS  
1738 Aug 28 Edward TATLOCK  
1738 Oct 6 Isabel RIGBY of Simonswood  
1738 Oct 15 George a child of William BROWNBIL  
1738 Nov 1 John son of John DAVIS of Altcar  
1738 Nov 4 Anne daughter of Elizabeth MEDOW of Simonswood  
1738 Nov 7 Edward son of John DAVIS of Altcar  
1738 Nov 12 Elizabeth a child of William CHISNAL of Knowsley  
1738 Dec 29 Martha a child of Edmund AUGHTON of Simonswood  
1739 Jan 3 Jane? daughter of John DERWENT a Papist  
1739 Jan 10 Margaret SHEPHERD widow a Papist  
1739 Jan 13 Elizabeth a child of John BROWNBIL of Fazakerley  
1739 Jan 16 Robert a child of Anthony HARRISON of Knowsley  
1739 Jan 23 Peter ORM a young man of Simonswood  
1739 Jan 25 Mary a child of Martha LINDFORD  
1739 Jan 28 Richard a child of Henry FLEETWOOD  
1739 Feb 19 Mary a child of William BEYSLEY  
1739 Feb 26 Mary wife of James MOORCROFT  
1739 Mar 13 John STOCK of Knowsley